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6. Mar 1987 - Table Tennis England

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6. Mar 1987 - Table Tennis England
I Editorial
NOlN
the chips are down
•••
WHEN it became clear last autumn that John Prean .was the voters' choice to take over the chairmanship of the English
Table Tennis Association few people inside the sport in Britain thought that the new style of leadership would bring
an easy life for players, administrators and fans.
I
I
I For five
I
l
I
years the dedicated gentleman from Ryde, Isle of Wight, slammed the administration without mercy and
it has to be said that some of his criticism was on target, because nothing is perfect in this life. In true democratic
fashion, the long time editor of this magazine, ETTA deputy chairman George Yates, allowed the continuous onslaught
to continue in what is the official organ of the ETTA, until finally the Prean offensive was halted to a cry of
"censorship".
As editor, I am considerably less influenced in my decisions than my predecessors because I am not a part of the
administration. It is better that way. No pressure is put on me by the chairman or anyone else. The columns are open
to all as long as we are not asked to print material that could be approaching the minefield of libel action.
The recent dismissal Of the selection committee and the heaping of huge new commitments on the shoulders of Donald
Parker plus the demotion of director of coaching David Fairholm has been seen as a devastating blow by a number
of people, especially the coaching fraternity.
, At the last national council meeting the chairman suffered a reverse when his request to bring in Bernard Rowley
, as coaching vice-chairman was turned down. The chairman is reported, accurately I am sure, as having the entire
management committee behind him on the latest moves elevating Parker and moving down Fairholm. For days after
the announcement of the shake-up, my telephone hardly stopped ringing. One gentleman was so incensed that he kept
the conversation going for nearly half-an-hour - there are no prizes for guessing his identity.
But before the national council goes into session in April it is vital for everyone to realise that the sport in England
is at stake. Diplomacy and constructive speaking is needed, lost tempers and threats of resignations can only lead
to the sort of publicity we do not really want.
I
When the council meets the wrath of councillors is.expected to show. There could be a showdown. But, the chips
are down, surely the objectors target should be the management committee and not just the chairman.
JOHN WOODFORD I
IJ
The official magazine of the
English Table Tennis
Association. Published eight
times a year.
Editor:
JOHN WOODFORD
Associate Editor:
FIONA BROWN
Advertisements:
Beth Davies
Subscriptions and distribution:
Beth Davies
ETTA, 21 Claremont,
Hastings TN34 IHF.
Tel: 0424433121
COpy DATES
March 12 1987
Issue 166 April 1987
April 12 1987
Issue 167 May 1987
Printed by:
Thomas Hill Print (1985) Ltd.
Bishop Auckland
Tel. (0388) 607511
Contents
Page
Courtside - all the latest gossip
2
World Championships - the first report from John Woodford on New Delhi
3
Coaching Changes - Tony Russe resigns
4
Planning for the future .... Donald Parker
5
Picture Parade ....
6
Lentec Senior Rankings
7
Fiona Elliot - John Woodford provides a profile of our new women's champion
9
Schildkrot British League .... a review by Fiona Brown
10-11
European League - England on top form
13
Schildkrot British League - ideas for the future from Rea Balmford
15
Lentec Junior and Cadet ranking lists
16
Chairman's Corner - up to the minute news from John Prean
17
County Championships .... Doug Moss
18
19, 20, 22, 23, 37
County Notes
English Records - Champions over the past 28 years
21
Regional Leagues
24
Coaching 1 - Rowden Fullen explains the coaching rationale behind his success
25
25
Coaching 2 - Tony Russe reviews the Triumph Adler National Championships
The Pioneer in 1902 - Gerald Gurney retells the origins of table tennis magazines
27
Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Schools
28
Players protest - the facts and a reply
29
Crossword - another super Stiga prize at stake in Eric Hall's latest brain teaser
31
Mailbox - Hughes, Muhr, Pettitt, Prean, Spraggs etc.
34
Cotswold Select - Bradley Billington in focus
35
Tournament Scheduling - Colin Clemett introduces some points to ponder
36
HilDA'S PIE
ONE of the best rules or recommen­
dations put in at the start of the
Schildkrot British League was about
serving hot food to teams after mat­
ches. When teams have to travel
long distances it is not right that on
a Sunday evening they should have
to break their journey to find food
at Little Chef or Happy Eater.
It is not easy to find kitchen a~­
commodation at venues and even
more difficult to find folk prepared
to give up their Sunday afternoons
to cook food but it should be done.
One of the few clubs still serving
a hot meal in the league is Erreys
Print in East Sussex, where "chef
de cuisine" Hilda Watts regularly
cooks her Shepherd's Pie, peas and
carrots to the always delighted
players, visitors, home men and
umpires.
When a recent match against
Ashford ended more sharply than
expected with an Erreys victory,
there were some rude words in the
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kitchen when at the vital moment of
serving the popular pie, Hilda
managed to kick a bucket of water
all over the kitchen floor!
Undaunted and singlehanded
Hilda carried on serving her hungry
customers who like Oliver Twists
came back for second helpings.
As an exercise in PR hot food
soothes many a savaged loser.
Shame on the clubs who cannot be
bothered to put on hot refreshments
for their visitors.
* * *
VACANCIES
SOUTHAMPTON'S Brian Lamer­
ton has spotted a highly unusual
advertisement in a Building Design
publication. A firm of architects
called Archer Boxer Partners is or
was looking for two "further
talented table tennis players for their
Hertford office." They also need to
be Architect-Technicians for
"lunch-time matches - architectural
experience and ability will also be re­
quired for extra-mural activities dur­
ing the rest of the day."
Sounds like an interesting lunch­
time scene at this Hatfield office, ex­
cept for indigestion probably suf­
fered by table tennis enthusiasts
bolting their sandwiches to get into
action in the table tennis room. Let's
hope the run-back is more than 4ft!
* * *
DELHI BEllY
ENGLAND'S gallant internationals
fell foul of various tummy bugs dur­
ing their visit to the World Cham­ pionships in New Delhi but as the
ETTA's much travelled General
Secretary, Albert Shipley, confirms
it seems to be a common problem
for teams far from home. "My
good friend Dr Helios Farrell, Presi­
dent of the Mexican Association
suffers from 'Montezumas Revenge'
when he visits England - it's not
so much poor hygiene as a change
in the minerals found in water and
the unfortunate price we pay for
travelling the world."
The 22 English people now
returned from Delhi are going to be
glad that the mystery has now been
solved at last.
* * *
ONE FOR THE GIRLS
ENGLISH junior champion Andrea
Holt left a few red faces behind her
in a recent Bolton League match.
Interleague players Clive Heap,
Keith Rudd and Jack Evans were all
beaten by Andrea whose team
Telecom North West are league
leaders.
* * *
lUCK OF THE IRISH
ONLY the irish could ask us to print
two reports of every event they
hold! Imagine the chaos if everyone
submitted on this basis - Please
make your minds up and nominate
an official PO!
* * *
BONNINGTON BOOM
AFTER many years of ETTA
meetings at the Bonnington Hotel,
London, it seems that the hotel's
management are inspired by our
sport. In addition to preferential
rates for the Association, they are
now installing a table tennis table
for staff leisure use.
* * *
'lET PLEASE'
An end of 'order'
NATIONAL Councillors showing
over zealous enthusiasm at the
January meeting were swiftly silenc­
ed by our new chairman's gavel ac­
companied by the request to 'Let
please' - gone are the stuffy days of
"order, order."
New PLAYBAK, League and
2
IWorld Championships in New Delhi
I
CHINA STILL RULES
L-
~
__=
_
But they were lucky
by JOHN WOODFORD flying back from New Delhi
STOP PRESS!
CHINA still dominates the table tennis world after the 39th World Championships at the Indira Gandhi
Stadium, New Delhi that ended on March 1st, with victory for a few, defeat for many and with nearly
every player and many others suffering from the dreaded stomach complaints that seem as much a part
of India as the Taj Mahal itself.
The Chinese coaches admitted
before the trek to India that the rest
of the world was catching them up and
the Peking coaches were right on
target. This time it was not a case of
the inevitable boring friendship clashes
when the Chinese met, they met less
often in the final rounds of the in­
dividual events so there was much to
admire in the way they handled their
opponents from other nations.
Jan-ave Waldner of Sweden now
looks like the only European who can
in the years ahead, expect to win the
world singles title. After almost scrat­
ching through sickness before taking
out Desmond Douglas in Round 4,
Waldner gradually pulled himself
together to defeat two Chinese top
men before losing in the final to the
reigning world champion Jiang
Jialiang, one of the few men in recent
times to retain the crown.
China should have lost the mens
doubles final. Lupulesku and
Primorac from Yugoslavia held two
match points before losing in the third
game to Chen Longcan and Wei Qing­
guang. China could also have lost the
womens singles crown. A fabulous
young counter-hitter from South
Korea Yang Young Ja was beaten in
the final 21-17, 21-19, 21-18 by Guan
Jianhua whose experience just manag­
ed to save her.
A quick glance at the team events
both won by China, men by 5-0 over
Sweden and the women 3-0 over South
Korea. Sweden were starting to wilt on
the way to the final - they only beat
West Germany 5-4 after Georg Bohm
took a stunning triple - and then when
Uif Carllson appeared in the final, the
writing was on the wall for the Swedes
who took the precaution of shipping
out to Delhi all their water supplies!
But they still caught the Delhi bug that
lies in wait for all and sundry, in­
cluding all members of the England
team.
Without making a complete list only
two members of the 22-strong group
from England to brave the trip manag­
ed to escape some form of stomach
upset - George Yates the seasoned
traveller, deputy chairman of the ET­
TA, general secretary of the ETTU
and myself. Most serious British
casualty was former England captain
Ron Crayden who was so bad that he
could hardly walk to the Boeing 747
that brought us home.
There was one player who was sent
home in the middle of the tournament
through illness - Mikael Appelgren of
Sweden. He was not able to walk to
the aeroplane!
So, on the playing side, China
repeated their 6 out of 7 successes at
Gothenburg, but 4 out of 7 would have
been a fairer reflection on how the rest
of the world are catching them up.
England went to India with one
world class star, Desmond Douglas
who took 14 out of 16 wins in the
Swaythling Cup, and returned with
two - Alan Cooke, after beating Chen
Xinhua in the team event and reaching
the last sixteen can now expect his first
World and European rankings and
hopefully his career will now be
airborne.
The Hazards
Results
Swaythling Cup: Final:
China b Sweden 5-0.
Corbillon Cup: Final:
China b South Korea 3-0.
England men finished 12th, England
women 11th.
Mens singles: Final:
Jiang Jialiang (China) b J.O. Waldner
(Sweden) 14-21, 21-18, 21-11, 24-22.
Womens singles: Final:
Guan Jianhua (China) b Yang Young Ja
(South Korea) 21-17, 21-19, 21-18.
Mens doubles: Final:
Chen Longcan and Wei Qingguang
(China) b I. Lupulescu and Z. Primora
(Yugoslavia) 21-17, 12-21, 22-20.
Womens doubles: Hyan Jung Hwa and
Yang Young Ja (South Korea) b Dai Lilli
and Li Hui Fen (China) 21-23, 21-13,
21-19.
Mixed doubles: Won by China but the
appalling results service did not supply
results to all journalists!
THIS PAGE has been hastily
prepared as the first story on
New Delhi, the drama, the
frustrations that epitomize world
championships. The further
stories in the April and May edi·
tions will give more facts on In·
dia and some opinions, some
that may startle readers, so make
sure of your copy now.
Alan Cooke 20, from
Chesterfield, Derbyshire, and
coached by Derek Marples was
one of the stars to emerge into
world class at Delhi. Marples
predicted that Alan would reach
the last 16 in the mens singles
but few thought he would beat
a Chinese player, Chen Xinhua,
who is coming to live in
Manchester!
Photo: Mike Loveder
They were many for all. But the sun
was shining most of the time - those
with the time came back bronzed.
Those without the time were either
playing, attending meetings or spen­
ding long periods inspecting the crude
plumbing in bathrooms and toilets.
The venue - the arena looked good,
nearly circular it would hold 25,000,
but the top crowd at the finals
numbered about 7,000 with 2,00 an
average on other days.
Delhi is said to have a bad record
for attendance at many sports and this
was borne out. A well-known English
sports journalist who I shall not name
said that overall it was the worst
organised racquet sports event he had
ever encountered round the globe. It
seems that in India journalists are not
well-received in their own country.
This was reflected in Delhi. The press
facilities were crude, dirty, smelly,
totally inadequate with no alcoholic
refreshment (anywhere in the
stadium). Six telephone lines were us­
ed to contact the whole world operated
by men who were so confused by the
whole thing that phones were hurled
across the telegraph and telephone
room and tempers became so frayed
that violence was not far away, even
in the stadium where the press seating
was insufficient on finals day causing
a situation that took four members of
the Indian army to restore order!
Championship tables
(llJOOon
ilQURB
3
ICoach Tony Russe resigns
The way forward?
Tony Russe
ON 12th February, 1987, I read in 'The Guardian' of the wide-sweeping
changes in personnel that affected the E.T.T.A. Coaching Scheme.
This decision had been taken by the Management Committee and the
word is that the decision was unanimous. Mark that well, there were
no dissenters, to date no resignations. One must therefore assume that
every member of the Management Committee was in favour and
accepts responsibility for the decision.
What was it that the Manage­
ment Committee did that prompts
this article? First, the post of
Director of Coaching held effec­
tively by Davi.d Fairholm for
some few months only was
discarded and David is now
returned to National Coach.
Secondly, the post of Chairman
of Selectors held by Paul Day for
only three months was taken from
him. Thirdly, the responsibilities
for these jobs have now been
vested in Donald Parker, the Na­
tional Trainer/Coach, thus mak­
ing him a very vulnerable profes­
sional, now much aware of the
winds of change. Don would be
an extraordinary man indeed if he
can remain completely impartial
to the pressures that will be put
upon him from all directions. Too
much is being asked of him.
These decisions which directly
4
affect the Coaching Scheme were
taken without consultation with
the National Coaching Commit­
tee, indeed the meeting planned
for the 14th February was hastily
cancelled. There was no need, the
St. Valentine's Day massacre had
already been executed in advance.
As Regional Coaching Chairman
for the South West I saw no alter­
native but to resign. What is the
point of having a National
Coaching Committee if it is not
consulted on coaching matters?
Remember fellow coaches that we
had no voice on the Management
Committee as the post of Vice
Chairman of Coaching/Selection
is vacant after Peter Charters'
resignation.
Now I am sure that all these
moves will be hotly defended in
the name of rationalisation and
they may yet work, provided all
persons cooperate in the fur­
therance of the cause. But it was
only last September that all the
top coaches in England, profes­
sional and amateur, were
gathered at Crystal Palace and
over a weekend of sane speeches
and forward planning, those pre­
sent went away elated and
motivated to further coaching and
to produce a successful National
team. I regret to say that our
plans have now been overridden
by the Management Committee,
some of whom were present at the
Crystal Palace conference.
Whenever there is a crisis in the
E.T.T.A. it seems that the
Coaching Scheme is used as a
whipping boy to the exclusion of
other areas. The latest cry is that
the Sports Council have stated
that our coaching system is ap­
palling. That is what is said. How
dare Sports Council or Manage­
ment criticise the coaches who
week in, year out give their time
and services willingly for table
tennis? I, among many, many
coaches, am always out of pocket
on behalf of coaching. I do it for
the players not for the system. If
such large sums of Sports Coun­
cil money have been paid to the
E.T.T.A. for coaching why have
I been hamstrung over the past
months in my Region for lack of
funds? There are many such ques­
tions which I am sure readers
could put forward.
Enough. If the Coaching
Scheme is to survive the present
shock then Management must
now take positive steps to
remotivate its professionals as
well as its amateurs. It should be
easy as motivation is now "zero".
Humpty Dumpty has had a great
fall and we all know what hap­
pened to him.
However, one great plus has
arisen out of the recent upheavals
in the E.T.T.A. hierarchy. The
mould has been broken. There is
now no going back to the com­
placency of the past. The way is
open for other men and women
of like beliefs who feel strongly
enough that they want to further
the cause of table tennis and its
players. The way is through the
ballot box. The membership has
already spoken for improvement.
What I disapprove of is poor man
management and the complete
disregard of the National
Coaching Committee on impor­
tant issues affecting the whole
Coaching Scheme. This is the way
forward?
I Parker
looks back
THIS ARTICLE should have
appeared in an earlier edition
but its contents are still valid and
well worthy of publication.
PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE
by Donald Parker, ETTA National Trainer & Senior England Captain
A VERY satisfactory season it is still necessary to evaluate
and plan for the future. The International Opens, the Euro­
pean Senior and Junior Championships could be regarded
as a success with the only dark spot being the defeat by
Bulgaria in the European League costing us promotion in­
to the Super League.
Looking at technical developments
from a general point of view we still
need to put a lot of work on service
and receipt. At the European Senior
Championships Csilla Batorfi spent
one hour every morning serving to
her father who simply caught the
ball and placed it in a bag. Maybe
a little boring, but certainly a ma­
jor factor that contributed to her
becoming the ladies singles cham~
pion whilst still being a junior. At
least 800/0 of her serves were with the
forehand from the backhand side
using a high toss throw-up and this
was typical of the majority of
players. A very loose grip is used,
the ball is struck very close to the
body, about four inches above the
table with the first bounce being
near the servers baseline. The wrist
is used excessively to impart vary­
ing degrees of speed and spin with
the bat "laid back" and the free arm
used to shield the point of contact
from the receivers vision.
It is of slight concern to me that
the coaching manual does not em­
phasise the use of wrist in general
play. It does stress the non-use at the
beginners stage but after a very short
period I believe it should be en­
couraged as at International level it
is undoubtedly the most crucial part
of the body and early use may
develop a players "feel", something
that is very difficult to do, if not im­
possible at a later stage.
It was very pleasing to see the
hard work put in with O'Driscoll
and Oldfield on their backhands,
developing more power, paid off.
With topspin players now it is equal­
ly important to have a strong
backhand as forehand and if I had
to identify one aspect of Persson's
game which contributed to his suc­
cess it would be his backhand.
Players are now taking, in certain
circumstances, a side to square
stance for the backhand, lengthen­
ing the swing and rotating the up­
per body especially when the ball is
wide down the backhand. It is
therefore my belief that the coaching
manual should introduce this techni­
que as soon as movement is inc
troduced. Instead of the body
behind the ball at all times the side
to square stance and the "power
backhand" be encouraged. Ob­
viously this stroke is not played
every time especially when close to
the table.
Of course players are still taking
the ball off the bounce, a technique
difficult to master but when played
successfully it is very effective.
Basically when playing "off the
bounce" the elbow must be angled
so that the natural swing of the arm
is almost parallel to the table sur­
face. The elbow and wrist in par­
ticular are used to a great extent
keeping the length of stroke fairly
short to enable a quick recovery and
contact is made almost on top of the
ball. Often the right hander when
using this technique on the forehand
will step in with the right foot (or
the wrong foot) to get nearer the
bounce of the ball. With all strokes
it is vital to play them to any part
of the table. In other words a top
class topspin player will be capable
of playing a strong topspin irrespec­
tive of where his opponent places
the ball to any target on the table
ie. from anywhere to anywhere. A
very basic statement but one with
fundamental implications on
coaching and practise.
In the case of male defensive
players ie. Matthew Syed, it is vital
to develop a good third ball attack
to put the receiver under more
pressure and also to develop a
strong topspin for when the smash
is not on against a pushed ball. At
the moment against Syed players are
comparitively relaxed receiving serve
as there is little threat behind them
and also when in trouble during a
rally they can afford to push long
and start again. Of course we are
now talking about being the best in
Europe something I am hoping Mat­
thew will be striving to achieve.
It goes without saying that all top
players play positively. By that it is
meant they· are playing to win and
not relying on their opponent los­
ing. Each stroke is played with a
purpose and not just a case of retur­
ning the ball back hoping the oppo­
nent will make a mistake. This does
not mean hitting the ball as hard as
possible at the first opportunity but
by playing percentage strokes all the
time ie. the short push return of the
short serve. Players should be en­
couraged to go for their shots when
the ball is there even if this does
result in a few early defeats. Pushing
around allowing the opponent to
take the initiative whenever they like
is a tactic at International level on­
ly the extremely gifted can do, at the
moment we have no one who fits in­
to this category. Players should be
encouraged for playing positively
even if a particular point is lost,
however, it is important to make
sure losing does not become a habit.
It is always difficult to express
fully in an article the technical, tac-
England NO.2 Carl Prean, master exponent of the close to the body, well
concealed service.
tical etc. developments. May I once
again remind all coaches that they
are welcome to attend the training
camps at Lilleshall to observe. There
will be an opportunity to talk to the
coaches and players as well as watch
the various practises. Last season
some 30-40 coaches took up the of-
fer and I am confident they all had
an enjoyable and informative time.
Should you be interested please con­
tact Donald Parker 0524-791866 and
arrangements can be made.
DONALD PARKER
E. T. T.A. National Trainer
Bannerettes
Badges of all types
Trophies
T·shirts & sweatshirts
All Club Insignia
I. ~~m:~~ f;t#l
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fJ~~~'t~~
.......................•.•
Il~~~~~~
trIll/HI/It
~lll{fttll~tll/l
Special commemorative medal struck for the
World championships in Birmingham. In
presentation box. Ideal for atrophy. £12.00 reduced to
£2.50 each. Twelve only leji.
Telephone or write for your edition of the Alec Brook
catalogue illustrated in full colour.
ADS (LONDON) LTD (DEPT TT I
49-57 HARROW ROAD
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LONDONW21JH£
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Tel 01-402 5671
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Telex 24652 Tieman G
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5
I Picture
parade
RIUMPHADLE
ENGLISH NATIONAL
Future champion? Alan Cooke has toughened up thanks to the Swedes.
Phoro: Stephen Line
Still the champ but Des Douglas has
plenty to think about.
Skylet Andrew, down but not out. No men's national title in 1987 but definitely a star in the making.
Photo: Courtesy Crawley News.
@)Why buy foreign when
•
6
I England ranking lists
-
February 1987
LENTEC COMPUTER RANKING LISTS
ME~
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
II.
12.
13.
14.
IS.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
Desmond Douglas
Carl Prean
Skylet Andrew
Alan Cooke
John Souler
icky Mason
Jimmy Slokes
Steve Mills
Philip Bradbury
Graham Sandley
Kevin Satchell
Mall hew Syed
Steven Scowerofl
Chris Rogers
Colin Wilson
Nigel Eckersley
John Hillon
Steven Dorking
Pa:J1 Whiling
Adrian Dixon
Da\id Wells
Bradley Billingion
Tony Taylor
Glen Baker
Max Crimmins
Andrew Wellman
Sean Gibson
David Dodd
\1ichael Hammond
Andy Creed
John Burleton
Carl lorgan
Desmond Charlery
lichael O'Driscoll
Paul Giles
Adrian Moore
Edwin Smilh
Barry Johnson
WOM[~
(Birmingham)
(Ryde)
(London EI5)
(Chesterfield)
( easden)
(Bcxhill)
(Reading)
(Sheffield)
(Aylesbury)
(Pollers Bar)
(Frome)
(Reading)
(Bohon)
(Leicester)
(Cumey)
(Warrington)
(M anchester)
(Hornchurch)
(Plymouth)
(Wolverhamplon)
(Millon Keynes)
(Chesterfield)
(Manchester)
(Guild ford)
(Wimbledon)
(Reading)
(Chorley)
(London SE7)
(Surbiton)
(Brislol)
(London SEI5)
(Birmingham)
(I.ondon E13)
(Mir0eld)
(plymouth)
(Bexhill)
(Gosfonh)
(Birmingham)
3199
181
1558
1518
1120
1111
1014
836
749
679
677
626
615
596
586
585
577
562
555
549
545
539
523
514
513
501
493
492
486
480
473
465
464
450
442
438
429
424
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
Andrew Syed
eH Taylor
Phil Smith
Brian Johns
Philip Gunn
David Gannon
Joe Kennedy
Stuan Palmer
Andrew Rich
Graham Toole
Dipak Topiwala
Mark Mitchell
David Harding
Stephen Turner
Kevin Beadsley
Sleven Sharpe
David Newman
Craig Bakewell
Rupen Bole
Percy Collino
John Green
Stephen Moore
John Payne
Ritchie Venner
John Taylor
Keith Samuels
Russell King
Michael Harper
Paul Amos
Philip Logsdon
Geoff Davies
David Barr
Andrew Dodd
David Goode
Rame h Bhalla
Darren Griffin
John Kilchener
Ian Robertson
(Reading)
(Cireneesler)
(Horley)
(Nonhwich)
(Birmingham)
(Leicester)
(London SE 15)
(Lakenheath)
(Wolverhamplon)
(Fareham)
(London N17)
(London 9)
(Carshahon)
(Presion)
(Bradford)
(Wakefield)
(Maldon)
(Sloke on Trem)
(Esher)
(London W5)
(I unealon)
(Bexhill)
(London N19)
(Crawley)
(Golders Green)
(SI Neols)
(Lowesloft)
(Biggleswade)
(Ashford)
( orwich)
(Waterbeach)
( ewbury)
(London SE7)
(Hayes)
(Guildford)
(Gloucesler)
(Ipswich)
(Newcastle)
415
415
414
401
398
397
390
386
362
360
356
346
345
339
336
335
333
331
330
329
328
325
325
324
318
317
317
315
314
311
311
309
309
308
308
306
305
301
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
II.
12.
13.
14.
IS.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
Lisa Bellinger
Fiona Elliot
Alison Gordon
Joy Grundy
Mandy Sainsbury
Jill Harris
Andrea Holt
Jean Parker
Juliel Houghton
Karen Smith
Joanne Shaw
Jackie Bellinger
Susan Collier
Suzanne Airey
Carol Butler
Claire POliS
Teresa Moore
Helen Bardwell
Kerry Hall
Debbie Soothill
Helen Lower
Helen Perro It
Claire Maisey
Jane Barella
Sandra Roden
Karen Burrows
Elaine Shon
Kim ludge
Cheryl BUller}'
Debbie Toole
Rachel Knighl
Julie Dimmock
Connie Moran
Elaine Sayer
Lisa Haydon
Diane St Ledger
Melonie Carey
Lesley Popkiewicz
(Dunslable)
(Wolverhampton)
(Reading)
(Preston)
(Newbury)
(Walsall)
(Ramsboltom)
(Preston)
(Tonbridge)
(Leicester)
( ormanton)
(Dunslable)
(Maidenhead)
(Gramham)
(Plymoulh)
(Chester)
(Bexhill)
(Ware)
(Chesler field)
(Carnfonh)
(Wolverhampton)
(Bristol)
(Swindon)
(Surbiton)
(Dudley)
(Caslleford)
(Plymouth)
(I.ondon E13)
(Lincoln)
( ormanton)
(Twickenham)
(Dunslable)
(Grimsby)
(London E12)
(Bremwood)
(Birmingham)
(Purilon)
(Purley)
1857
1597
1524
1515
866
669
534
493
486
476
471
469
358
350
347
336
300
284
256
233
216
212
198
196
195
193
191
184
154
153
146
135
121
118
1I7
III
110
103
NATIONAL JUNIOR RANKING TRIALS
Peter Charles lines up with
the cadet girls medal winners.
Left to right: Suzanne
Lawton (ev), Joanna Roberts
(Y), Helen Wright (Dv) and
Caroline Buckley (Bd) .
British is best?
..AaoooDlJ
lIIilqUB&
7
IThe New Champion
FRUSTRATION FOR FIONA
Indian bug bites England champion!
by JOHN WOODFORD flying home/rom Delhi.
IN THE history of English table tennis it is doubtful if any English
champion has ever been frustrated as 21-year-old Fiona Elliot of
Wolverhampton after travelling 5,000 miles to India to play at the
World Championships and then to be unfit to compete in the in­
dividual events.
On the way home Fiona told me
two of whom Dawn (28) and Alison
"This has been the biggest disap­
(24) have teachers coaching badges
pointment of my table tennis career
for table tennis.
so, especially as it was my first world
For top-class practice Fiona
championship. I played in seven
travels down on odd occasions to
matches in the team events before visit Lisa and Jackie Bellinger at
I became ill."
Dunstable. Other well-known
"I was in bed for three days after
players among her practice partners
being sick one hour before I was due
are Andy Rich, Trevor Washington,
to play" she said.
Jill Harris and Janet Dunning.
As reported elsewhere, all three
Fiona first played when she was
women in the England squad were
II, developing into a right-handed
ill during the 16 days they were in
counter-hitter, a style that seems to
Delhi but that is no consolation to
be nicely suited to modern play. Her
the new champion who is extreme­
first major title was the Essex 3-star
ly keen to succeed with her ag­
in 1984.
gressive attacking game.
One of her most important wins
Her most important assignment
for her personally she says, was the
ahead seems to be the showdown
Wolverhampton Closed title. In
match against West Germany in
1985 she won a team gold medal at
Wurtzburg next month when a past the Commonwealth Championships
victory over Katja Nolten might at the Isle of Man. Her Schildkrot
move her selection. Other tour­
British League club is Steelstock,
naments ahead for her are the
Wolverhampton; she was born at
Cleveland international event at Old Windsor, trains up to 10 hours
Thornaby and the Stiga Essex 3-star weekly and enjoys socialising, walk­
open.
ing, squash and badminton and to
Fiona's coach for all of her career
really relax, reading.
(10 years) has been Mr Roy Durnall,
ETTA chairman John Prean has
deputy head-teacher of her school
said recently that' 'defensive players
at Penn, a district of Wolverhamp­
following the advent two-colour
ton. Fiona is extremely keen on the
bats are becoming obsolete." That
physical fitness side and what can
typically sweeping statement having
be more important?
watched the world championships in
Delhi has a lot of value.
Sponsor
Fiona Elliot is a player who
believes that attack is the best form
Sponsorship of a personal nature is
so important to top players. Fiona of defence. Better still, counter­
Elliot is sponsored by Kettler (Great
hitting in other words speed is the
Britain) Ltd manufacturers of sports
best tactic to defeat the opponent.
goods including table tennis tables. , Fiona with her speed and fitness
They are based at Redditch.
after recovering from India, could
Apart from Mum and Dad at
have a great future over the next 10
home, Fiona has four older sisters,
years.
Eyes/rant - Fiona Elliot enroute to herJirst National singles title playing
against Lisa Bellinger.
Kettler catch a champion
WITHIN a few days of her victories in Crawley Fiona Elliot had signed
a superb sponsorship deal with Kettler (GB) Ltd., one of the coun­
try's top table tennis and keep fit equipment companies.
The deal gives Fiona the financial backing to maintain her relentless
programme of training. "My sponsorship by Kettler allows me the
freedom I need to practise and to attend training camps."
Kettler's sales and marketing director, Geoff Burrows, said after
signing: "We have provided financial help for Fiona in the past, but
the two year sponsorship stresses the backing we are not giving to table
tennis and follows a period when we have seen a massive increase in
the sales of our own tables."
Fiona Elliot will be making guest 'appearances at selected sports retail
outlets during 1987 on behalf of Kettler (GB) Ltd.
West Midland Cadets League
AN excellent match between leading teams Pontesbury A and Wrexham
resulted in an honourable draw. Wrexham had to thank Welsh No. I cadet
Spencer Harris for his unbeaten three games, while the locals were best
served by Alistair Corfi~ld and Mathew Alexander with two wins each.
Gloucester A, without No I Andrew Harris, were well beaten by the
Welshmen. Pontesbury B with a full team on duty managed two wins, in­
cluding an excellent derby win of 6-4 over Grove.
The final session, scheduled for Saturday April 18th, sees the teams play
their last match and an individual league championship.
Organiser: John Morris, 2 School Bank, Pontesbury, Shrewsbury. Venue:
Mary Webb School, Pontesbury.
Mum's the word - Mrs Elliot Fiona's Mother took a reluctant step into
the limelight at Crawley.
Photo: Stephen Line.
Results - Pontesbury A 10, Gloucester B
0; Hereford 0, Grove 10: Grove 4,
Pontesbury B 6' Pontesbury B 10,
Hereford 0; Gloucester B 0, Grove 10;
Hereford 0, Gloucester A 10; Wrexham
7, Pontesbury B 3; Pontesbury A 9,
Stroud I; Wrexham 5, Pontesbury A 5;
Gloucester A I, Wrexham 9; Stroud 10,
Gloucester B 0; Stroud 4, Gloucester A 6.
League table
Pontesbury A
Wrexham
Gloucester A
Grove
Stroud
Pontesbury B
Gloucester B
Hereford
P W L D P
6 5 0 I II
6 5 0 I 11
6 5 1 0 10
6 3 3 0 6
6 2 4 0 4
6 2 4 0 4
6 I 5 0 3
6 0 6 0 0
9
J IJ Schi Idkrot
British Table Tennis League
Promoted by the English Table Tennis Association
Outstanding Ormesby
"OUR best performance for some
time" was Ormesby manager
Alan Ransome's modest analysis
of his team's outstanding perfor­
mance which earned a 4-4 draw
and effectively ended Grove
Market Drayton's premier divi­
sion title dreams in early
February.
The Ormesby squad had
travelled south with very limited
expectations, as Ransome points
out: "Their No. 4 is ranked
higher than our No.1 so on paper
we were heading for an 8-0
defeat." At the end of the after­
noon Grove were forced to rely
upon their vastly experienced,
former England international,
Graham': Sandley, to save face
with victory over Scottish star
David McIlroy.
Grove's problems began in the
first set when English world
championship team member John
Souter was effectively stifled by
the effervescent Nigel Eckersley.
John Hilton then showed young
Jimmy Stokes a trick or two to
win in straight games. Indeed it
was a disappointing day for
Stokes who also succumbed to
John Broe. Ormesby's point win­
ning performance.came from the
in-form Eckersley who took full
advantage of a less than accurate
day for Steve Mills. Ormesby are
now aiming to finish the season
with a claim in the premier divi­
sion prize pot.
Devastating Denis
Former English champion Denis
Neale helped to complete a suc­
cessful Ormesby weekend with
two fine wins for the clubs second
team in their 6-2 victory over title
hopefuls, EAE Waveney. Neale
dissected Waveney No. 1 Phil
Lodgsdon before showing young
Neil Pickard what experience is all
about in two straight games, 9
and 10.
Lower down the second divi­
sion there are two teams making
a desperate eleventh hour bid to
avoid relegation. Kingbro In­
surance clinched another vital
point in their 4-4 draw with
Steelstock as captain Malcolm
Corking showed the way with
wins over Trevor Washington and
Steve Dunning.
Oldham savoured their first
win of the season 6-2 over Sincil
Lincoln as No. 1 Mike Owen
pushed the northerners ahead at
important stages in the match.
Rejects hammer
Ramlosa
South Londoners, Rejects, have
now placed both hands firmly on
the third division south trophy
following a spectacular 7-1 win
over arch rivals Team Ramlosa
Essex. Man of the match was Re­
jects' No.1 Mike O'Leary, who
dealt efficiently with Stuart Gibbs
and the highly ranked Des
Charlery. Over 100 spectators en­
joyed the match but could not lift
Ramlosa beyond a consolation
win by Ian Attridge over Trevor
Campbell.
According to both team
managers the match was played in
exceptionally good conditions
with tremendous sporting spirit
and spectacular style so anyone
finding it difficult to promote
their team may be well advised to
seek help from either of these
clubs.
Unstoppable
Ashford
League leaders Ashford seem set
to cruise through their remaining
second division south fixtures if
their 8-0 win over Jaques
Fareham is anything to go by.
English international Alison Gor­
don was elevated to the first team
in the absence of David Goode
and acquitted herself admirably in
two games against Dave Pilcher
and Mark Wilding.
Alas, the Ashford story in the
third division south is less cap­
tivating, they fell pray to Erreys
Print, 6-2, to leave themselves
only two points away from the
bottom of the table.
SCHILDKROT PLAYER OF MONTH
NOVEMBER
HENRY BUIST
For proving yet again that ability is more important than equip­
ment in contributing straight game wins over Keith Willett and
Andrew Trott to lead Trebor Dagenham FC to a 5-3 win over
third division east opponents MBS St Neots.
Henry is pictured receiving his award from Essex County Secretary,
Mrs Gill Squier.
. . Schildkrot distributed by Butterfly •
10
I British
League 2
SCHILDKROT FIXTURES
March
15
P
P
P
P
1
1
1
1
Ormesby v Omega Reading
Rotherham v Steelstock Wolverhampton
MBS St Neots v Butterfly Cardiff
Panoramic Bath v Grove
Trebor Dagenham FC v TCB Dolphins
Express Torbay v TSP Larkhall
Omega Claw v Byker Newcastle
Chan Construction v West Warwicks/Birmingham
P
P
P
P
1
1
1
1
Steel stock Woverhampton v Ormesby
Omega Reading v MBS St NEwts
Butterfly Cardiff v Grove
Panoramic Bath v Rotherham
TSP Larkhall v Trebor Dagenham FC
TCB Dolphins v Omega Claw
Byker Newcastle v Chan Construction
West Warwicks/Birmingham v Express Torbay
April
5
RESULTS FROM EIGHT DIVISIONS
Premier
Omega Reading I, Panoramic Bath
7; Steelstock Wolverhampton 4,
Grove 4; Steelstock Wolverhampton
7, Rotherham I; Grove 7,
Panoramic Bath I; Grove 4,
Ormesby 4; Panoramic Bath 0,
Steelstock Wolverhampton 8; But­
terfly Cardiff 6, Omega Reading 2;
MBS St Neots 2, Rotherham 6; But­
terfly Cardiff 0, Steelstock
Wolverhampton 8; Rotherham 3,
Grove 5; MBS St Neots 0, Grove 8.
First
Trebor Dagenham 8, Omega Claw
0; TSPLarkha1l3, Chan Construc­
tion 5; Chan Construction 6, Trebor
Dagenham 2; West Warwicks/Bir­
mingham 2, TSP Larkhall 6; Byker
Newcastle 4, TSP Dolphins 4;
Omega Claw 0, Express Torbay 8;
Byker Newcastle 8, Omega Claw 0;
Trebor Dagenham FC 4, West War­
wicks/Birmingham 4; TSP Larkhall
5, Byker Newcastle 3; Express Tor­
bay 4, TCB Dolphins 4.
Second North
Bradford Investments 6, Kingbro
Insurance 2; March I, Sindl Lincoln
7; EAE Waveney 2, Ormesby 6;
Kingbro Insurance 2; Steelstock
Wolverhampton 5, March 3; Sindl
Lincoln I, Bradford Investments 7;
Oldham I, EAE Waveney 7;
Kingbro Insurance 4, Oldham 4.
Second South
Gunnersbury Triangle 2, Global
Plymouth 6; C and L Nittaku 8,
Fellows Cranleigh 0; TSP Larkhall
0, Ashford 8; Jaques Fareham 5,
Gunnersbury Triangle 3; Global
Plymouth 5, Medway 3; Fellows
Cranleigh 7, Gunnersbury Triangle
I; TSP Larkha1l6, C and L Nittaku
2; Jaques Fareham 0, Ashford 8;
Medway 6, Fellows Cranleigh 2;
Gunnersbury Triangle 4, TSP
Larkhall 4; Ashford 6, C and L Nit­
taku 2; Jaques Fareham 2, Global
Plymouth 6.
Third North
Chan Construction 6, Grove 2;
Grove 7, Oremsby 1; Vickers Bar­
row 2, Chan Construction 6;
Crusaders Lincoln 2, Leicester 6; Ci­
ty of Leeds 7, Byker Newcastle I;
Leicester 8, Vickers Barrow 0;
Ormesby 8, Vickers Barrow 0; Chan
Construction 7, Crusaders Lincoln
I; Byker Newcastle 0, Leicester 8;
City of Leeds 5, Grove 3.
Third South
Countryman Tunbridge Wells 7, Er­
reys Print I; Rejects 2, Thorn EMI
Ellenborough 6; Abeng Warriors 3,
Team Ramlosa Essex 5; Deptford
Rams 5, Ashford 3; Thorn EMI
Ellenborough 5, Countrymen Tun­
bridge Wells 3; Deptford Rams 4,
Abeng Warriors 4; Erreys Print 6,
Ashford 2; Team Ramlosa Essex 1,
Rejects 7; Countrymen Tunbridge
-Wells 3, Team Ramlosa Essex 5; Re­
jects 8, Deptford Rams O.
Third East
Witham Town FC 3, Britannia
Ipswich 5; Trebor Dagenham FC 8,
Smith Motors Peterborough 0; Nor­
wich Foxwood 4, AHW Pioneers 4;
MBS St Neots 2, Well Connected
Wellingborough 6; Britannia
Ipswich 6, Trebor Dagenham 2;
Smiths Motors Peterborough 0,
Norwich Foxwood 8; Well Con­
nected Wellingborough 5, AHW
Pioneers 3; MBS St Neots 6,
Witham Town FC 2.
Third West
Opella Leominster 6, Omega Read­
ing 2; Duchy Launceston 4, Pano­
ramic Bath 4; Express Torbay 2,
Doleq Carpets 6; KCD Stiga 2,
Opella Leominster 7; Panoramic
Bath I, Jolliffe Poole 7; Express
Torbay 5, Duchy Launceston 3;
Omega Reading 0, Doleq Carpets 8;
Doleq Carpets 6, KCD Stiga 2;
Opella Leominster 5, Panoramic
Bath 3; Doleq Carpets 8, Duchy
Launceston 0; Omega Reading 8,
KCD Stiga O.
Ashford's winning team, from left to right: Dave Weisman (team manager),
David Goode, Max Crimmins, Glenn Baker, Kenny Jackson.
Schildkrot British League
(as at 22.2.87)
'premier division
Steelstock Wolverhampton
Grove Market Drayton
Panoramic Bath
Butterfly Cardiff
Rotherham
Ormesby I
'Omega Reading
;MBS St Neots
,First division
!Express Torbay
iChan Construction
Trebor Dagenham FC
ITSP Larkhall
TCB Dolphins
Byker Newcastle
West Warwicks B'ham
Omega Claw
Second division north
Bradford Investments
EAE Waveney
,Ormes by II
Steelstock Wolverhampton
'SincH Lincoln
March
Kingbro Insurance
Oldham
Second division south
Ashford
Global Sports Plymouth
C & L Nittaku
Fellows Cranleigh
Medway
Jaques Fareham
Gunnersbury Triangle
TSP Larkhall
P
W
II
II
9
8
5
4
3
3
0
0
10
10
8
7
8
9
D
2
3
I
I
2
I
0
0
P'
0
0
4
5
3
3
8
9
F
79
68
45
32
33
22.
II
6
A
9
20
35
48
31
34
53
66
20
19
II
9
8
7
0
0
57
54
56
47
40
38
27
9
23
26
32
41
40
42
53
71
18
15
15
12
10
9
3
0
L
8
7
7
6
4
4
I
0
2
I
I
0
2
I
0
0
2
3
5
4
5
8
10
11
9
7
7
4
4
3
I
I
0
I
0
3
I
I
4
2
2
2
2
3
5
7
7
8
58
55
45
44
39
35
34
26
30
25
27
36
41
53
62
62
18
15
14
II
9
7
6
4
II
11
II
11
11
10
10
7
5
5
3
3
2
2
0
I
3
I
2
0
2
I
0
3
3
5
5
7
7
8
79
52
48
43
37
29
32
24
9
36
40
45
43
51
56
64
22
15
13
II
8
6
6
5
II
10
10
II
II
10 10
10
10
II
10
9
10
10
II
12
II
II
I
IEurop~an League
GAMBLE PAYS OFF AT ESJBERG
ONE of the last selections the ETTA seven-strong selection
committee made before it was dismissed by chairman John
Prean with the unanimous backing of the entire manage­
ment committee was to send a European League side to
Esjberg in Denmark without our top three players, Douglas,
Carl Prean and Bellinger.
Another slightly astonishing
happening was the appointment
of a woman captain, Jill Parker
- the first time that a lady has
been in charge of a European
League team for England. But
those insiders know that Jill is a
master tactician and had the full
respect of all members of the team
who just managed to scrape
through 4-3 against quite a strong
Danish team.
However, Alan Cooke, Skylet
Andrew and Fiona Elliot were the
chosen trio and they did what was
asked for, namely secure the point
needed to keep England on top,
although they only lead West Ger­
many by a single game, having
lost three in Denmark.
The man who did the damage
by stopping both Andrew and
Cooke was Lars Hauth, a man
who last season beat Vlf Carsson,
the Swedish ace. Fortunately for
England the Danish No.2 Erik
Sonnichsen was not of the same
calibre, losing to the English pair.
After Skylet went down in the
opening game, England recovered
ground when Cooke won his
match but Fiona Elliot lost to the
experienced Charlotte Polk.
Happily, two fine doubles wins
by England put the promotion
challengers back on course. After
the men's doubles win for
England Andrew and Elliot snat­
ched the vital mixed doubles.
The Danes struck again when
Hauth beat Cooke 19, 13 but the
day ended nicely for England
when Andrew hammered Son­
nichsen 16, 12 to give England the
4-3 scoreline.
Comment from Jill Parker was:
"It was a tough match, Hauth is
certainly a class player, but
England players fought hard and
we got the result we were after. "
Results: L Hauth b S Andrew 19,
19; A Cooke b E Sonnichsen 11, 15;
C Polk b F Elliott -15, 16, 11;
Andrew/Cooke b Junge/Son­ nichsen 20, 18; Andrew/Elliot b
Hauth/
Polk 16,22; Hauth b Cooke 19, 13;
Andrew b Sonnichsen 16, 12.
ENGLAND II NORWAY
(as at 9.2.87)
P
5
5
4
5
4
5
5
5
W
5
4
3
3
2
1
1
0
2
2
4
4
5
F
27
20
18
20
14
12
13
9
A
8
15
10
15
14
23
22
26
P
5
4
3
3
2
L
0
0
2
3
3
4
4
4
F
30
29
12
12
12
17
13
15
A
5
6
16
23
23
25
22
20
P
5
5
2
2
2
2
1
L
0
2
2
2
2
2
4
7
F
34
25
22
21
18
18
8
A
1
17
15
14
17
10
27
48
P
5
4
3
3
3
2
L
0
1
I
International Table Tennis ---- International Table Tennis
EUROPEAN LEAGUE
EUROPEAN LEAGUE TABLES
SUPER DIVISION
Poland
Yugoslavia
Sweden
Czechoslovakia
Hungary
Netherlands
Bulgaria
France
Cooke was equal to the challenge of leading England in Esjberg.
I
1
0
Sweden play Hungary in Ronneby on April 8.
FIRST DIVISION
ENGLAND
F.R. Germany
Austria
Finland
Turkey
Italy
Denmark
Norway
P
5
5
4
5
5
6
5
5
W
5
5
2
2
2
2
1
SECOND DIVISION
Belgium
Wales
Scotland
Spain
Luxembourg
Switzerland
Greece
Guernsey
P
5
6
5
5
5
4
5
7
W
5
4
3
3
3
2
I
I
Tuesday March 31st 1987
at the
HALSTEAD
SPORTS CENTRE
Colne Road· Halstead· Essex
Tel: 0787·472480
I
0
I
I
0
Commencing at 7'30pm
--Tickets: £3"50 availablefrom-­
Community Services Dept.· Braintree D.C.
Causeway House' Bocking End
Braintree' Essex Te1.0376·23131 ext.313
PLEASE ENCLOSE REMITTANCE & S.A.E.
International Table Tennis - - - - International Table Tennis
13
Rea Balmford - an open letter
Thoughts on the Schildkrot British League
WITHIN my own county of Yorkshire I have something
of a reputation for being 'anti' Schildkrot British League,
formerly the National League, but this reputation is not
wholly deserved - what would be a more accurate assess­
ment is that I am 'anti' the 'S.B.L.' in its present form. If
the competition could be integrated into the whole table ten­
nis pattern from the grass roots to the very top, I could well
beco~e one of its greatest supporters.
Looking in from the outside, there were a number of reasons for the
setting up of the National League, the most laudable objectives being to
provide 'top' competition for the 'top' players, to increase spectator in­
terest and thus to expand our sport and give prospective sponsors a plat­
form from which they could benefit both themselves and table tennis.
In other words, to increase the 'professionalism' - an expression which,
in my part of the country, is one to be respected and not frowned upon
- although I cannot completely draw a veil over what many felt to be another
objective - the prevention of a 'drain' to the continent.
So, how far is the League serving its purpose? Alan Cooke, Carl Prean
and Skylet Andrew, ranked Nos 2-4 in the November list, are all playing
much of their table tennis abroad, with both Carl and Sky unable to com­
pete in the Yorkshire and Humberside 3*, the first of the new Stiga Grand
Prix series, at Halifax in late October.
Looking at the line-up of the Premier Division of the League and the
ran kings of the players in the then current list (T.T. News, October 1986),
the 32 listed players, which included four Welshmen and two Scots, rang­
ed between Nos 1 and 51 on the Lentec list - probably not an unreasonable
spread, but not one calculated to bring the uncommitted spectators flock­
ing in and to cause prospective sponsors to fidget in their plush chairs.
This appears to be borne out by a disappointing spectator response while,
on the sponsorship front, only the equipment manufacturers and distributors
appear to stay the course for any It;ngth of time.
Not a lot of pluses there, so let us consider the points on the other side.
No less than fourteen Sunday dates are taken out of the calendar, which
makes the task of trying to fit in other fixtures - County, Inter League,
National Cup, County Cup, Closed Championships, etc. - near impossi­
ble, and I have not mentioned tournaments, the area where the ordinary
player has traditionally broadened his experience to become a better player.
There is no 'local loyalty' in teams with players imported from the four
corners of the country, while managers have a knack of. taking players from
a county to which many, particularly in the case of 'County of Birth', have
a passionate attachment. Here I make no secret of the fact that I would
like to see this particular tradition of the Yorkshire County Cricket Club
spill over into table tennis.
The value of not only County competition, but also Inter League com­
petition is debased - the players either do not play at all, or a secretary
gets the familiar reply - 'Sorry, I can't play that weekend, there is a Na­
tional League Match'.
Finally there are the number of players lost to the tournament circuit,
which, of course, reduces the possibility of sponsorship, for the sponsors
naturally want the big names to help advertise their product.
So, have we got to the stage of the 'tail wagging the dog'? Eight divi­
sions, each of eight teams, making a total of 256 players, with many of
those in the lower divisions being well below the standard which was once
demanded in most Inter Town sides.
So far my comments have been wholly critical, but we have to go no
further than the Western European countries to see how a national league
can operate. Let us spread the jam more thickly at the top, making the
S.B.L. a real elite, axe the ordinary club competitor at the bottom (who
would get as good, if not better competition in his League's Intern Town
side) and have the likes of Cooke, Prean and Andrew parade their talents
in this country.
England is not overflowing with T.T. players of the highest class, but
a full British Premier League of twelve clubs, each fielding a team of three
players in seven (yes - seven) game matches could - I dare not say would
- attract the public.
Matches should be played on a midweek date - say Thursday - thus leaving
the stars available for major tournaments, where the prize money, and there
is room here for a greater spread of this commodity, must be made attrac­
tive County Championship Premier weekends, Top Twelve, National Knock
Out competitions, challenge matches, etc.
Why teams of three? Simply that there are not enough top men to pro­
duce teams of four of the high standard demanded; why seven games? This
is not too many to maintain the interest of the 'man in the street' spectator.
In addition, the No 3, already a good player, but probably still improv­
ing and aiming for the top, will have the incentive of meeting a contestant
of his own calibre at No 3 and one slightly better at No 2.
Where would these teams be based? In the major centres of population
in the country, now all accessible by Motorway (why not use the R.C.C.
Rea Balmford - a lifelong table tennis supporter.
regions as a basis?) with the three extra teams in the great centres of popula­
tion not already covered (two in London, one each in Manchester and Liver­
pool?) or in the geographically far flung areas (Plymouth, Norwich?).
So give us the best of both worlds - top spectator T. T., played largely
by adequately rewarded professionals, in midweek, and flourishing Inter
Town Leagues attracting good players with a loyalty to a League which
has probably introduced them, coached them and provided them with com­
petitive T.T. since that early introduction.
Add to this a popular tournament circuit as a proving ground where the
ambitious player can come up against, and occasionally beat, a household
name, and we may help to slow down, if not to halt the drift away from
our sport.
And, of course there will be movement from one area to the other - talent
scouts from the big National League sides looking for raw material to be
groomed for the 'big time'. This, surely, is what it is all about!
NO - I am not satisfied with the present absolute domination of table
tennis by the S.B.L., but I do feel very strongly that there is an important
place for it.
YES - I would like to see a return to loyalty to League and County, where
nailbiting matches have given me so much pleasure in the past, and I would
like to see the ladder restored by which Tony Clayton, from my own League
of Hull, made his way from school T.T. team, through club, Yorkshire
League and County side to that never-to-be-forgotten England squad which
made history as the first Westerners to be accepted into China for many
years.
I have tried to be constructive in my comments which could be summed
up as placing the S.B.L. into a pyramid structure just one level below the
top - the national side - and seeing it operate as an integral part of, and
not in competition with, other areas of T.T.
Everybody will not agree with these views, and there will no doubt be
a number of errors of fact, but please, if you wish to pull the concept to
pieces, be constructive and try to put forward a solution which will keep
the sport alive and moving forward at every level from grass roots to the
very top.
REA BALMFORD,
Hull
Editor's Note:
Our man in Hull has made some excellent and constructive points in this
article which J hope will be studied closely by the Management Commit­
tee of the ETTA and everyone else. It is true that ordinary tournaments
are finding it extremely difficult to find sponsors mainly because star
players have other more pressing engagements.
15
I England Junior
& Cadet ranking lists • January 1987
LENTEC COMPUTER RANKING LISTS
,
JUNIOR BOYS
(Reading)
I. Matthew Syed
2. Bradley Billington
(Chesterfield)
3. Michael O'Driscoll (Mirfield)
(Chorley)
4. Sean Gibson
(Sheffield)
5. Chris Oldfield
(Nottingham)
6. Jobn Holland
7. Matthew Pernett
(Esher)
(Wakefield)
8. Andrew Ball
9. Jonathon Taylor
(Manchester)
(Wolverhampton)
10. Adrian Thorp
I I. Mark Ward
(Sheffield)
(Reepham)
12. Neil Pickard
(Bury)
13. David Carse
14. Darren Smith
(Birmingham)
15. Damien Holland
(Billericay)
(Willesden)
16. Tommy CUller
17. Leigh Jerrries
(Birmingham)
18. Richard Hutchinson (Ipswich)
(Torquay)
19. Richard Aitken
20. David Morris
(Pontesbury)
(Bude)
21. Neil Bevan
(Stockton)
22. Stuart Miller
(Burton-on-Trent)
23. Gary Knights
24. Neil Simms
(Pontefract)
(Oldham)
25. Wayne Renton
(Preston)
26. Andrew Eden
27. Michael Aucterlonie (Salisbury)
28. Michael Oakley
(Sheffield)
29. Phillip, Szekeres
(Enfield)
(Coulsdon)
30. David Carter
(Yorks)
31. Andrew Horsfield
(Halirax)
32. Mark Stephenson
(Crawley)
33. Scott Greenbrook
34. Robert Lowe
(Formby)
(Nottingham)
35. Adrian Bolton
36. Jasinder Singh
(Swindon)
37. Michael Parker
(Stockport)
(Rushden)
38. Ian Bird
(Preston)
39. Michael Malcolm
40. Robert Till
(Walsall)
41. Jason Clarke
(East Ham)
(Burton-on-Trent)
42. Stephen Hanks
(Reading)
43. Keith Hodder
(Tun Wells)
44. Michael Harrison
45. Peter Bowler
(Dunstable)
46. Andrew Houghton (Tonbridge)
(Brentwood)
47. Martin Cole
48. Christopher White (Ippelpen)
(Crawley)
49. Alan Cole
(Birmingham)
50. Rajinder Singh
(Camberley)
51. Graeme Connelly
52. Darryl Sneyd
(Oldham)
(Milton Keynes)
53. Stephen Baggaley
(Barking)
54. Grant Solder
(Bradford)
55. Kevin Pickles
(Ashford)
56. Matthew Boon
57. Robert Fearn
(Nottingham)
(llford)
58. Jason Teodler
59. Christopher Glossop (Chesterfield)
(Edmonton)
60. SlUan Grassick
(Sheffield)
6 I. Stephen Horsfield
(Stockton)
62. James Nicholsoo
(Woodrord Grn)
63. Ian Harris
1221
1013
884
701
633
527
476
464
.463
457
426
413
406
379
364
362
342
326
307
299
293
290
288
283
281
276
266
255
249
243
236
232
231
229
219
217
215
209
208
207
205
202
197
196
195
194
186
181
181
173
171
169
167
164
164
164
163
159
158
156
154
151
15t
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
7I.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
n.
78.
79.
80.
8I.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
98.
99.
100.
Ian Black
Jeremy Krzystiniak
David Butler
David Thomas
Richard Jones
Andrew Bevan
Robert Ettridge
Paul Burgess-Allan
Paul Smith
David Stedman
Richard Pike
Nicholas Felton
Martin Adams
Robert Maries
Richard Grant
Joel Roodyn
Dale Saunders
Sean Gaylard
Scott Solder
Mark Beaumont
James Patterson
Simon Pryke
Ian Collier
Chris Nicholls
Gavin Black
David Ball
Stephen Bettison
Howard Whewell
Richard Todd
Paul Ward
Nicholas Csillag
Ian Windle
Karl Albon
James Maciver
Gregory Moore
Richard Pratley
Thomas Parker
(St Albans)
(Croydon)
(Tun. Wells)
(Rugby)
(Morden)
(Bude)
(Newbury)
(Frimley)
(Bridgwater)
(Arundel)
(Wetherby)
(Birmingham)
(Ascot)
(Frimley)
(Nottingham)
(Finchley)
(Cinderford)
(Plymouth)
(Barking)
(L. Buzzard)
(Hatfield)
(Ramsey)
(Durham)
(Ipswich)
(Bedford)
(Wakefield)
(Nailsea)
(Lanes)
(Coventry)
(Rochdale)
(Wallington)
(St Ives)
(St Neots)
(Barnsley)
(Southampton)
(Worcester)
(Stockport)
150
146
141
135
128
126
123
119
119
118
116
115
114
109
109
107
104
101
101
99
98
96
94
93
92
91
89
83
83
82
81
81
80
79
79
77
76
JUNIOR GIRLS
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1I.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Andrea Holt
Kerry Hall
Claire Potts
Debbie Toole
Melonie Carey
Helen Lower
Julie Norman
Nicola McGrath
Joanne Roberts
Jane Wright
Julie Billington
Helen Wright
Caroline Buckley
Kristioa Cox
Karen Perkins
Julie Forster
Andrea Ambrose
Kate Gower
Sarah Pengelly
Susan Richmond
Helen Potts
Tanya Holland
Anne Pashley
Hazel Kavanagh
Tina Sadler
Barbara Smallwood
Julie Brion
(Ramsbottom)
(Chesterfield)
(Chester)
(Normanton)
(Bridgwater)
(Wolverhampton)
(Newbury)
(Preston)
(Leeds)
(Plymouth)
(Chesterfield)
(Plymouth)
(Luton)
(Rainford)
(Ipswich)
(Loughborough)
(Ipswich)
(lngatestone)
(Paignton)
(Northallerton)
(Chester)
(Billericay)
(Guisborough)
(Hull)
(Yeovil)
(Formby)
(Aylesbury)
1010
980
844
519
481
460
451
391
387
300
284
267
260
251
249
248
234
229
220
190
175
172
157
141
131
130
130
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
Susanne Lawton
Mary Allan
Katherine Goodall
Tracy Scott-Pawson
Maria Williams
Allison Gower
Julie Clegg
Penny Corden
Caroline Dada
Lisa Pritchett
Caroline Seaholme
Sharon Norman
Louise Sherratt
Emma Hurling
Rosemary Rainlon
Natalie Riley
Rebecca Fisher
Joanne Keighley
Amanda Dawkins
Karen Richardson
Elizabeth Connell
Allison Ledwitch
Helen Stephens
(Ormesby)
(Reading)
(Yorks)
(Boumemouth)
(Herts)
(lngatstone)
(Preston)
(Derby)
(Bradford)
(Kingston)
(Watrord)
(Birkenhead)
(Starrord)
(Herts)
(Hastings)
(Stoke-on-Trent)
(Totten ham)
(Yorks)
(Mickleover)
(Oldham)
(Yorks)
(Birmingham)
(Grantham)
128
124
123
1I7
102
102
97
97
95
95
92
85
83
79
78
77
76
74
68
64
61
61
59
CADET BOYS
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
I I.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Leigh Jefrries
Neil Bevan
Andrew Eden
Gary Knights
Brian Mileham
Mark Stephenson
Peter Bowler
Michael Aucterlonie
Grant Solder
Mark Bawden
Alan Cole
James Patterson
Craig Smith
Ian Black
Paul Davison
Howard Whewell
Marlin Adams
Peter France
Paul Carter
Kevin Horsfield
Jason Blake
Gregory Bridget
Steven Riggins
Garry Tendler
Gavin Yates
(Birmingham)
(Bude)
(Preston)
(Burton)
(Margate)
(Halirax)
(Dunstable)
(Salisbury)
(Barking)
(Launceston)
(Crawley)
(Hatfield)
(Selby)
(St Albans)
(Worksop)
(Rossendale)
(Ascot)
(Doncaster)
(Coulsdon)
(Sheffield)
(S Croydon)
(Plymouth)
(Washington)
(IIford)
(Oxon)
925
656
566
471
454
426
425
362
350
288
287
275
242
234
214
200
185
182
153
150
143
118
112
108
108
(Leeds)
(Harrogate)
(Chester)
(Luton)
(Plymouth)
(Leeds)
(Ormesby)
(Paignton)
(Hull)
(Leicester)
(S. Coldfield)
(lngateslOne)
914
548
514
444
442
390
388
378
338
285
279
220
CADET GIRLS
I. Joanoe Roberts
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
I I.
12.
Ellen Meildings
Helen POliS
Caroline Buckley
Helen Wright
Kate Goodall
Susanne Lawton
Sarah Pengelly
Samantha Marling
Elizabeth Bryant
Nicola Meddings
Alison Gower
@)Tables that last buy Jaques
16
-, From the chairman
NO BED OF ROSES
WHEN I ran for the Office of ETTA Chairman I knew that success
would not give me a bed of roses. Vigorous critic though I had been,
what I found was much worse than I had expected - far more pro­
blem areas and much greater problems in each. There is unfortunate­
ly a small committed clique anxious to interpret each step in the worst
possime light, totally ruthless and often a stranger to the truth. There
is no reason why they should not nominate a candidate in the next
election to run against me. That opportunity will come in less than
a year. In the meantime I need a few months in which everybody gets
behind me.
CASH FLOW
Since my election there have been very few days when I have not put
ina 12 or 14 hour day 4 or 5 times each week. The financial problems
alone have been monumental. We still need substantial sponsorship
income to balance our books. Immense efforts are being made in that
direction. The Office Repairs at the end of our lease in Hastings will
adversely affect our cash flow by some £25,000. It is no comfort now
that we have had the benefit of a very cheap rent for so many years.
We MUST get our financial base right. We owe that to the sport and
to our Treasurer, an excellent man.
RED TAPE
I have made the point that the Association often seems to be drown­
ing in formalities and red tape, costly to produce and time-absorbing
to read. We must become more business-like and trust people more.
I hope that the majority will accept that I am trying to move the sport
forward and that the election slogans of "abrasive" and "seeking con­
frontation" will be shelved for a y¢aror so. I have, in fact, been try­
ing to build bridges and have gone out of my way to let 'election op­
ponents' know that there are no problems on my side and that I want
everybody to work together.
CHANGE NEEDED
I was not elected to sit around in unchanged and unchanging surroun­
dings. There have to be changes if the ETTA is to survive. We have
lost a third of our members in a few years. What further warnings
do we need? We are working very hard to improve the image of the
sport, to gain Television exposure and to win the respect of the media.
We have made strides on all these fronts. The Membership Commit­
tee will begin work soon to battle against the decline in numbers. We
are trying to right the trends of at least two decades.
COACHING
Much has been made of the Management Committee's efforts to
restructure o*r Coaching Scheme and my own ideas and discussion
points which I threw in as a contribution to the debate were hotly
criticised. I don't mind that. We are now on the way to a better struc­
tured and managed Coaching Scheme which will serve our members
better as well as affording better opportunities to many excellent civilian
and professional coaches. I am grateful to the Sports Council for their
input. Perhaps they saw our problems earlier than we did. We are trying
to define a clear road to the top for both the ambitious player and
coach. Few get to the very top, but it is one of the charms of the sport
to find out how far you can go.
A SET-BACK
You will have read how the National Council vetoed my nomination
for Vice-Chairman of Coaching, Bernard Rowley. It remains my opi­
nion that Bernard is a fine man, a Vice-President of the Association,
a great honour bestowed by my predecessors, a 2 Star coach, Regional
Coaching Chairman, Organiser of the famous Littlehampton Sum­
mer Camp and tireless worker for the sport. The present England Cap­
tain relates how his father took him to Bernard's camp all the way
from Preston when he was 12 years old! (The press and others placed
various interpretations on this, even connecting it to my expressed hope
that we would have an England Captain who would have sole charge,
which would mean the end of the committee system in selection).
I want Bernard by my side in the difficult days ahead and I hope
my colleagues on the National Council will take that on board. Most
of us are elected for only one year, our freedom to act restricted by
many factors including constant financial constraints. What we do need
in that brief period is the support and confidence of our members.
FANTASTIC!
Finally, we enjoyed a resounding and notable success in the staging
of our National Championships in Crawley. My very warm thanks
to all concerned. An excellent venue, a fantastic men's final, very good,
helpful organisation and, above all, a good committed crowd, all made
it an occasion to remember. It was standing room only. We sent free
tickets to every league and county and still doubled the previous year's
box office receipts. It was the start - and only the start - of our new
marketing strategy. To use an old phrase: It was a glimpse into the'
future and it worked. A time to be proud to be part of the sport, the
shape of things to come. Proof, which I never needed, that this is a
great sport.
'
SHOOTING OURSELVES IN THE FOOT
We must stop shooting ourselves in the foot. It makes little sense for
me to spend days. enlisting the support of Fleet Street if the tourna­
ment the following week-end finishes too late to get even the results
into the papers, nor if this late finish produces a 'crowd' of less than
50, because everybody has gone home, unable to postpone the journey
any longer. That does not please present sponsors and does not make
the sport look good. Neither can it make sense to stick rigidly to
scheduling which ensures many boring hours for the ones who have
come to watch and support. It has to be a three dimensional partner­
ship - Player, Organiser and Spectator. THEN the sponsor will be pleas­
ed to join in and support will come that makes it possible to expand
the sport.
•••••••
£800 sponsorship for
Yorkshire Junior Open
NALGO have joined forces with
the Yorkshire TTA by injecting
an £800 sponsorship into the
Yorkshire Junior Open ·to be
held at Northbridge Leisure
Centre, Halifax on April 25 and
26. The event is restyled as the
NALGO Yorkshire Junior
Select Open, reports our
Yorkshire scribe Rea Balmford.
that'.s goodll
TRAGEDY
A shadow was cast over the
Southern Veterans open at
Brighton on February 28th.
David Jones, 52 from
Reading, Berkshire, a heart
patient, collapsed and died
on court from cardiac
failure. A full report by
Mike Watts, the organiser,
will be in the April Edition.
aoDrlon
aqUB&
17
I County
championships - Doug Moss
WEATHER CREATED HAVOC WITH FIXTURES
HEAVY snow and ice made travell­
ing very difficult over the weekend
17/18 January and led to two-thirds
of matches being postponed. One
match secretary on being asked
about notification of postponement
said 'phone lines down and he
couldn't even find the postbox!
Matches played were:
SENIORS
2A: Warwieks 4, Leics 6 - War­
wicks put up a good fight against a
strong Leics team. Phil Glinn and
Micky Browne (Wa) beat Phil
Smith. The ladies got the other two
events - Di StLedger beat Julie
Revill and, partnered by Sandra
Peak man, inflicted the first doubles
defeat on Karen Smith and Julie
-17, 19, 20!
2B: Middlesex II 5, Kent 5 - Mid­
dlesex II - Graham Sandley, Col­
in Wilson, Mark Mitchell, and the
result a draw! Kent ladies took three
events. At 2-4 Lesley Popkiewicz
beat Gillian Blanch 9, - 18, 22 and
at 3-5 Juliet Houghton won against
Angela Mitchell -8, IS, 17. Joe
Kennedy secured a draw for Kent
with a 19, 19 win, in the last event,
over Mark Mitchell.
3A: Clwyd 6, Warwieks II 4 - A
close match and Clwyd's first win.
3C: Northants 6, Cambs II 4 ­
Graeme McKim and Keith Jones
won five for the home team and,
despite losing their singles, Margaret
Maltby and Joyce Porter (Np) beat
Yvette Hooks and Alison Edge in
the ladies doubles.
3D: Hants 7, Herts 3.
4A: Essex III 9, Beds II 1.
VETERANS
Premier Division
The teams in this division, with the
exception of Essex and Worcs, got
together at Ashford TTC for the
weekend 24/25 January. Cheshire,
who so narrowly lost the champion­
ship last season dominated the
scene. They lead the table and are
the only unbeaten team. There were
some surprising results, the most
outstanding being the 9-0 defeat of
Middlesex by Sussex.
To
recompense I must mention the
Middlesex 6-3 win over Lincs (last
season's champions). The Sussex
team had a very good weekend ­
they also beat Lincs - and are se­
cond in the league table. Andy
Meads was introduced to the Sussex
team and he won 7 of his 8 singles
matches.
There are just three players with
100070 records at this stage, namely
Doreen Schofield (Ch), Connie
Moran (Li) and Roger Hampson
(Ch). The nearest Roger came to
losing this was against Robin Stace,
whom he beat at 22-20 in the third
game. Keith Horton and Robin
Stace have 100% in doubles but had
a very close shave against Mat
Sheader and Brian Allison (Li) win­
ning - 13, 20 and 22!
18
2A: Yorks 8, Cheshire II 1; Leics 3,
Notts 6; Essex II 8, Northants 1;
Northants 4, Herts 5 - Yorks in
fine form. Only one event went to
a decider when Brook/Walmsley
beat Timewell/Powell - 19, 16, 17.
Unfortunately Pat Hammond (Ng)
had to retire hurt in her singles and
the mixed doubles was not played.
Dave Marsh (Np) won the final
event against Essex II to save a
"whitewash" .
2B: Middlesex II 6, Dorset I 3; Wilts
2, Bucks 7; Berks 19, Hants II 0 ­
Les Wooding (Bu) was involved in
two close finishes verses Wilts. He
beat Brian Powell - 13, 15, 18 and
in the doubles, with Alec Watson,
beat Basil Thompson/Mike Oxley
21, -18, 19.
3A: Lanes 6, Norfolk 3; Cheshire III
1, Yorks II 8 - Lancs got their first
win - a convincing one, as they led
6-1. Each of Lancs men (R. Ashley,
N. Pearson, A. Chase) won a
singles. M. Neary won her singles
and mixed doubles with A. Chase.
3B: Hunts II 6, Berks IV 3; Beds 3,
Herts III 6 - Brian Spittlehouse
(Hu) was in good form winning two
singles and the doubles with
Christine Albon. Chris also won her
singles over Marion Dyke 9, - 18,
20! A good team effort from Herts
- the men each won a singles; Keith
Hartridge/Dick Emmerson won the
men's doubles; Brian Gill/Gill
White won the mixed. Gill also kept
her 100% singles record.
3C: Herts II 4, Oxon 5; Berks III 2,
Sussex II 7; Essex II 9, Beds I 1 ­
Oxon involved in their third 5-4
match - this time a win! A. Davies
and J. Paul (Ox) won four singles
and Mrs A. Wotherspoon beat Mrs
S. Tyler - 16, 20, 18!
3D: Herts IV 0, Surrey II 9; Dorset
II 5, Berks II 4 - Not so easy for
Surrey as the result suggests. Four
events needed a decider - the ladies
singles the closest when B. Winn
beat S. Bax - 9, 14, 21.
(Veteran's teams - please give
Christian names).
JUNIORS
Premier division
The second weekend of matches
were on 7/8 February at the ex­
cellent St. Neots Club. A vital match
to decide the championship was the
Yorks/Lancs clash, coming in the
first round. Yorks dominated with
a 9-1 win. Sean Gibson got the on­
ly event for Lancs with a 19, - 14,
8 win over Chris Oldfield. And it
was virtually over - Yorks cham­
pions again! Last season they pip­
ped Staffs by one sets average. This
season, over 7 matches, Yorks drop­
ped five events! One naturally thinks
of Yorks as Michael O'Driscoll and
Chris Oldfield. But Andrew Ball
won 13 of 14 matches and Debbie
Toole got 100% in singles and
doubles (with Ellen Meddings and
Joanna Roberts). Joanna lost only'
one singles. What a team!
Highlighting other individual per­
formances - Bradley BiIlingtoIJ.
(Dy) was the only boy to achieve
100% in the singles - beating both
Michael O'Driscoll and Chris
Oldfield at 16 in the third game.
O'Driscoll suffered just the one
defeat. John Holland played very
well to win II out of 14 singles in­
cluding a win over Sean Gibson
(La). In the girls singles Helen
Lower (St) came next to Debbie
Toole - Debbie inflicting her only
defeat. Helen had a good 17 in the
third win over Kerry Hall (Dy). Kate
Gower (E) did very well to win six
of seven singles. Her only loss was
at 19 in the third to Julie Forster
(Dy). The doubles were dominated
by O'Driscoll/Oldfield with 100%;
Sean Gibson/David Carse lost on­
ly to them. After the Yorks girls
came three pairs dropping just two
events
Holland/Gower,
Hall/Forster, McGrath/Clegg.
The main excitement concerned
relegation. Notts, one of the two
promotees, managed to stay in the
Premier. In the final match Notts
came from 2-4 to force a draw with
Kent. This means Kent join
Glamorgan (the other promotees)
for demotion.
League table
PWD
Yorks
7 7 0
Lancs
7 6 0
Derby
7 5 0
Staffs
7 3 I
Essex
7 3 0
Notts
7 I 2
7 I I
Kent
Glam
7 0 0
L F A
o 65 5
I 46 24
24426
3 33 37
4 32 28
4 28 42
5 24 46
7 8 62
P
14
12
10
7
6
4
3
0
2B: Surrey 7, Herts 3 - Caroline
Seaholme and Maria Williams
played well to win the three for
Herts, all needing a decider. Mat­
thew Pernet, Richard Jones,
Graeme Connelly got seven wins for
Surrey.
3A: Lanes II 5, Durham 5; Cheshire
II 8, Clwyd 2 - Lancs versus
Durham was a hard fought match
throughout. Darryl Sneyd (La) re­
tained a 100% singles record with
a 16, -13,27 win over Ian Collier!
3B: Hunts I 10, Hunts II 0 - Hunts
first team showed no mercy and
strengthened their position at the
top of the table. Three events did go
to a decider.
3C: Wores 3, Somerset 7 - Worcs
first defeat and Somerset
strengthened their bid for the cham­
pionship. Tina Sadler and Jo Web­
ber retained their 100% singles and
doubles. Richard Pratley (Wo)
again in good form with two wins
including the defeat of Paul Smith
-16,16, 17.
3D: Berks II 0, Middlesex II 10;
Herts II 3, Surrey II 7 - A
"whitewash" for Berks but girls
(Becky Fisher/Sandy Lynes) put up
stour resistance in doubles against
Karen Slafford/Nicola Cracknell
- 12, 15, - 20.
SENIORS
3A: Cheshire II 1, Clwyd 9 - Ron
Vose It John Ellis 15, -12, -14;
Tony Vaughan It Paul Griffiths
-17, 18, -20; Tim Malkin b
Trevor Manning 20, - 19, 12;
Lynne Harrison/Anne Williamson
It Evelyn Wright/Justine Thomas
-IS, 16, -14; T Malkin/Vose It
Manning/Ellis 10, -15, -18; Vose
It Griffiths - 21, - 21; Williamson
It Thomas - II, - II; Malkin It
Ellis -13, -19; Harrison It Wright
- 17, - 15; Vaughan It Manning
-14, -18.
An excellent away win for Clwyd
with just Trevor Manning losing
their one set. John Ellis and Paul
Griffiths winning both their singles
and Clwyds ladies also winning with
both Evelyn Wright and Justine
Thomas on top form.
The Table Tennis Association of
Wales' ranking lists for I February
1987 show North Wales players
ranked in most sections. Men's ­
Mark Thomas (joint 2nd), Trevor
Manning (7th), Paul Griffiths
(14th), Justice Evans (25th). Ladies
- Heidi Cotter (2nd), Evelyn
Wright (3rd), Justine Thomas (4th).
Junior boys - John Ellis (1st),
Spencer Harris (8th), Kris
Moulsdale (16th), Gary Jones
(28th), Andrew Jones (31st), Nigel
Roberts (18th). Junior girls ­
Justine Thomas (1st), Natasha
Williams (5th), Tracy Sambrook
(7th), Claire Elliot (12th), Susan
Lees (13th). This is a great improve­
ment on a few years ago when North
Wales hardly ever had any players
in the ranking lists, and shows a
greater involvement in national
events.
JUNIORS
3A: Clwyd 3, Leics 7 - Spencer
Harris It Cris Kinsey -19, 17, -7;
Andrew Jones It Andrew Clark - 9,
-13; Kris Moulsdale It Richard
Grimley - 15, -13; Tracy Sam­
brook/Natasha Williams b Liz
Bryant/Jayne Freer 16, -21, 15;
Moulsdale/Harris It Kinsey/Clark
-16, -13; Harris b Clark -15, II,
17; Williams b J Freer 15, 14;
Moulsdale It Kinsey 16, - 16, - 16;
Sambrook It Bryant - 14, - 17;
Jones It Grimley - 9, -15.
In a very exciting match at one
stage it looked like Clwyd would
manage to take a drawn match,
however with the score at 3-5 Kris
Moulsdale after winning the first
game 16, then lost the next two by
the same score. This win was a tur­
ning point in the game and the final
score was a 7 sets to 3 win for Leics.
For Clwyd their wins came from
Spencer Harris who won his singles
against Andrew Clark and Natasha
Williams who beat Jayne Freer and
with Tracy Sambrook also won the
girl's doubles. A much improved
display from the Clwyd side and
with a little more good luck they
could have got something from the
match.
I County
Notes 1
BEDFORDSHIRE
Dawn Campbell
AFTER reporting in my last notes
the disappointment of entrants in
the County Senior Tournament, I
"have to report yet another disap­
pointment in the County Junior
Tournament - only 27 entrants.
Results
Girls singles U-14: M Davidson b K
Cotterill 7, 13; Boys singles U14: C
Bowler b T Brown 14, 17; Girls
singles U17: K Cox b A Cotterill 9,
10; Boys singles U17: P Bowler b T
Harris 10, 16; Boys doubles U14: S
Wilkin/C Bowler b T Brown/P
Dunn 16, 16; Boys doubles U17: M
Simmonds/T Harris b M Wilkin/M
Bowler - 14, 10, 10; Girls doubles
U17: A Cotterill/K Cox b S
Dawson/J Strode 12, 12; Mixed
doubles: P Bowler/J Green b M
Wilkin/S Dawson 14, - 16, 14.
The Bedford League held again
their annual Derby and Joan Han­
dicap Tournament. Despite a rather
poor turn out enjoyment was had by
all.
The tournament was won by Divi­
sion 6 player, Delroy Codrington
who beat Tim Sparrow of Division
5.
The tournament raised £50
towards the British Heart
Foundation.
In the Veteran Inter League, Bed­
ford beat North Herts 7-2 but lost
to Hunts Central 6-3.
Results of Luton League Divi­
sional Tournaments which were held
early in the new year.
Division 1 Singles: M Hussain b D
Willis 15, 15; Doubles: M Hus­
sain/R Taylor b G Sharpe/T Har­
ris 13, -19, 19.
Division 2 Singles: I Marquis b M
Blackbourn 10, 17, 19; Doubles: I
Marquis/B Bailey b C Tilcock/D
Champken 19, - 18, II.
Division 3 Singles: K Thompson b
S Cartwright 16, 14; Doubles: K
Thompson/D Hawkins b S Cart­
wright/M Farrow 17, -II, 17.
Division 4 Singles: C Clark b L
Gresham 15, -22,20; Doubles: D
Patel/L Gresham b R Marriott/S
Webb 17, 18.
Division 5 Singles: T Marsh b J
Hassall 18, 19; Doubles: A
Hassall/J Hassall b M Horton/R
Horton -19, 20, 19.
Division 6 Singles: S Trevanion b R
Penn II, 16; Doubles: A Nolan/R
Penn b S Pinnon/G Phillips 14, 18.
BERKSHIRE
Bob Adams
THE 1986 Berkshire Closed Cham­
pionships could scarcely be said to
have produced a crop of surprises,
since despite an entry of close to 200
only 2 events were contested by
other than the No I and 2 seeds. By
the end of the first day Dave Jones
had managed to defeat No I seed
Alec Watson but all others had gone
Colin Taylor
completely to the seeding commit­
tee's predictions. Easily the most
ROGER STEWART of Carlisle has
spectacular match of the day was the
been deservedly recognised fo( his
Junior Boys Singles final where
Robert Ettridge treated the spec­
efforts in reviving interest among
tators to some amazing Boris Becker
the junior players of the Carlisle
dives before going down (literally)
area. Roger was recently named as
to Keith Hodder's all powerful hit­
Sports Personality of the year at the
ting. On day two Alec Watson had
Sands Centre where he coaches four
times a ··week. Assistant Centre
his chances of reversing his earlier
losing finalist position when he . Manager David.Gill said, "Roger
battled through to the finals of the ." has: shown outstanding commitment
Mens Doub.Ies (with Frank Earis), . 'to his sport and the Sands".
and the Mens Smgles. Alas, poor
Roger won the 'award ahead of
Alec, It Was not to be, smce ,club
other nominees including a Com­
mat.es Graham Kemp and Paul
monwealth high jumper.
Savl11s. cleaned up all t~e sen.lOr
Much to Roger's delight the
mens titles between them, mcludmg
young up and coming Carlisle
the under 21.. The other names to
players did him proud at the Cumfeature on thiS year's trophies w i l l .
.
bna Closed Jumor Tournament held
. h L d' S' I
.
be Jane C 0 h en m t e a les mg es,
Gill Kni htle and Mar Stafford
at Carhsle. Stephen.Temple (No 3
seed) proVided the biggest shock of
g dY ft
tYh
ree year
wore
.
h
turne a er a
break to Ladies Doubles success,
the day by defeatlng the No I seed
Martin Adams who won the Cadet
from. Barrow, John Backho~se, m
Boys title for the third successive
the fmal of the V 17 ~oyS smgles,
year, Lisa Crick in the Cadet Girls,
- 23, 13, 18. Temple s aggressive
style of play never let ~ackhouse setand Mary Allan who after winning
the Junior Girls teamed up with
t~e down and resulted m an excltmg
fmal.
Diana Spindlow for the Girls
Other Carlisle players to shine
Doubles.
were Nicholas Thompson who beat
Both Bracknell and Maidenhead
have recently held their Closed
the No 2 seed, Gordon Dwane from
Championships, with many of the
Kendal, as early as the 2nd round
above names cropping up. In
of the VI7 singles, 15, -19, 19.
Bracknell, County Champion Paul
Thompson was in fact losing 16-19
Savins swept through to the Mens
in the third game.
Singles title, but must have been
Mark Nanson also claimed a
slightly surprised to go down in two
seeded players scalp by comfortably
straight sets to Martin Adams in the
beating Stephen Watt, the No 4 seed
under 21. Jane Cohen as well as suc­
from Barrow -18, 18, 11.
cessfully partnering Sue Stoute in
In the semi-finals Backhouse beat
the Ladies Doubles, also triumph­
Mark Temple (Carlisle) II, 12 and
ed in the Singles. Ted Cripps won
Stephen Temple beat Nicholas
the Mens Veterans for the ninth
Thompson 17, 19. In the doubles
time, whilst Bob Sym and Mike
Backhouse and Watt gained some
Lennon took the Doubles. The divi­
revenge by defeating the Temple
brothers 17, 16 in the final. The V17
sional titles went to Mark Hudson
(Premier), Frank Winnard (Div 1 girls singles resulted in an easy win
and 2), Mark Armstrong (Div 3 and
for Paula Sloane (Carlisle) over
4). Keith Norman from Division 3
Amanda McKie (Carlisle) 6,8. The
devoured all that were put in his way
V14 singles title came to the south
to take the Handicap after a hard
of the County thanks to Tony
final ~gainst Steve Dorrell. A special
Dawson ,(Barrow) who came from
mentIOn must be made of shortly to
behind in both games for a
be wed Sean Toma~ and Lm?a
creditable 21, 18 win over Michael
Green, well k?own I~ Berksh~re Greenop (Carlisle).
In the Carlisle league Division
Ta?le Tenms cI!c1es, smce despite
One no team has emerged from the
losmg m the fmal of ~he Mixed
pack as yet and this is reflected in
Doubles to the aforementIOned J.ane
f
Th
Cohen and Bob Sym, must conSider
. d' .d I
111 IVI ua
per ormances.
e
their success in reaching the final a
averages leaders have all lost at least
good omen!
t~ree tlm~s. Top n~mes are Geoff
Any Leagues currently bemoan­
BI~ch (Wigton): Juhe McLean (TM
ing a lack of interest on the part of
spectators should take a trip to
Wmdows), Cohn Powell (Spartans)
and R.o~er Stew~rt (~partan~).
Maidenhead to find out how they
manage to get an audience of 200 to
DIVISion Two IS bemg' dommated
their final. One can only assume
by the young Sports Centre teams
that it is not the Cabaret, free booze
with Stephen Temple at the top of
or Green Shield stamps which does
the class.
it, but fine organisation under Mike
The County Junior side have won
Davis with sponsorship of The
two of their three matches so far this
Anglian Building Society to help,
season. The latest was an 8-2 win
plus good entertaining Table Ten­
over Cheshire in which John
nis over a number of years. This
Backhouse, Stephen Temple and
year carried on the tradition with
Margo Lewis excelled to win all their
wins for Mark Curtis in the Mens
singles. Paula Eddy helped Margo
Singles and Sue Collier in the Ladies
to a girls doubles win and Stephen
Singles.
Watt added a singles win.
CUMBRIA
DERBYSHIRE
Malcolm Allsop
THE Derby League combined the
Divisional and Individual Closed
Championships into a crowded day
at the St Benedicts School, with 16
events being contested in two Halls.
Jane and Philip Vickers took the
major honours with three Titles
each. The Mens and Ladies Doubles
events were combined into a Senior
Doubles event. Philip and Jane
combined to become the first win­
ners of the Senior Doubles, and re­
tained their Mixed Doubles title.
Stephen Yallop was an early
casualty when he hurt his back pick­
ing a ball off the floor! This left
Martin Simpson a clear run through
to the final where Philip Vickers
proved too strong.
Jane Vickers fought off the
challenge of Julie Forster and
Marilyn O'Sullivan to win the
Ladies Singles.
Most popular winner of the day
was hard-working Dave O'Donnell
who took the Division Four Singles
with victory over experienced Stuart
Russell.
Derby Mens team have started
magnificently in the Senior Division
of the Midland Table Tennis League
and have won their opening four
matches. Derby have gained 7-3
wins over Gloucester and Chester­
field; 9-1 against Wolverhampton
and 8-2 against Coventry.
Philip Vickers has led the Derby
team strongly winning II of his 12
singles sets, and combining with
Stephen Yallop to win all 4 doubles
sets. Derby's title hopes could rest
on the result of the crucial final
match against Birmingham on 4th
April.
Geoff Gill won the Mens Singles
at the Matlock League's Closed
Championships, with his biggest
challenge coming from the improv­
ing Ian Burton, whose hard hitting
extended Gill in the semi-finals.
Pat Thorley won the Ladies
Singles, and then teamed up with
husband, Mick, to win the Mixed
Doubles.
Mick Thorley was hard-pressed in
the Veterans Singles, beating the
holder, Harvey Flint, in an enter­
taining semi-final. In the final,
Geoff Birch pulled back from 16-19
down in the third game to lead 20-19
before Mick clinched the title by
22-20.
Matlock Closed Championships:
Results:
Mens singles: Semi-finals: Geoff
Gill b Ian Burton 17, -16, 15; Dave
Fearn b Tony Gregory 11, 17.
Final: Gill b Fearn 7, 16.
Womens singles: Pat Thorley b Jill.
Burton 13, 17.
Eastwood Juniors travelled to
Knighton Park, Leicester and came
close to winning the Junior Division
of the Midland Table Tennis League
against a strong Leicester team.
19
ICounty Notes 2
DURHAM
ESSEX
GlOUCESTERSHIRE
Harry Black
Laurie Darnell
Alf Pepperd
FOLLOWING their creditable 5-5
draw away to Lancashire II at
Preston, Durham juniors went on to
beat local rivals and league leaders
Northumberland 7-3.
Mandy Naisbitt (16) from Shiney
Row who plays for Houghton YM­
CA in the Philadelphia League
made a successful debut for
Durham and a winning formula in
the girls events has hopefully been
found.
Sunderland are through to the last
eight of the Carter Cup following a
5-1 win away to Ormesby.
Paul Swift, Steven Riggins and
Ian Collier played very well indeed
and fully deserved their win.
The Durham County Closed
Tournament took place at Lawhills
Road Sports Centre, Peterlee on
22nd February. A report will appear
in the next issue.
Another tournament in the area
is the Maureen Kerry Memorial
Tournament being held on 8th
March at Consett Sports Centre
which was sponsored by local firms
Professional Flooring Services and
Paul and Laughran Ltd.
Around the Leagues
South Shields
Reyrolles A are the only unbeaten
side and currently lead the division
by two points over Brinkburn A and
have two matches in hand.
Leading positions:
P W D
Reyrolles A
Brinkburn A
Brinkburn D
Tyne Dock B
Tyne Dock A
9
II
12
9
g.
8
8
7
6
5
I
2
I
2
2
L Pts
o
I
4
I
I
76
74
70
61
57
Sunderland League
North Centre 'A' extend their lead
at the top of the first division
following a 7-5 victory against se­
cond placed St. Gabriel's A. Echo
A are closely tucked behind in third
place.
Burn Park Meths and Silksworth
CC B are the front runners for the
second division title. In division
three Ryhope Road B lost their
unbeaten tag when they lost to
Emplex A 7-5.
Red House Y.W. could pose a
threat to both St. Gabriel's CC B
and M.C.F.E. as they have games
in hand over both of them.
Division 1
North Centre A
St. Gabriels A
Echo A
W D
L Pis
16
15
13
I
0
0
o
63
2 58
2 54
Division 2
Burn Park Meths 12 10
Silksworth CC B II 8
Belford House B II 8
2
3
I
0 43
0 38
2 33
20
P
17
17
15
PHYLLIS LAUDER had a surprise . County Teams
Providence Capitol County Premier
Christmas present. On the 24th
League
Our Senior Match v Yorkshire had
December 1986 she received an in­
to be postponed because of bad
To date this League has only met
vitation to attend the World Cham­
weather (guess it was not the only
once this year, early in February we
pionships! Phyllis will fly out with
one put off that terrible weekend)
are now at the half way stage, hav­
the official ETTA party on 17th and to date of writing has not yet
ing played five matches out of ten.
February and will return on the 2nd
been re-arranged. Likewise our
March 1987.
Juniors in Div 3C fared the same
P W L Pts
I understand that the host coun­
fate against Dorset, however that
Rudford .......... 5 5 0 40
match has been now arranged for
try selects about ten people of all na­
Cheltenham ..... 5 3 2 26
March 28th.
tionalities who are members of the
C.E.G.B. ........ 5 2 3 23
More
recently
our
Seniors
lost
to
Victor Barna inspired Swathling
Forest ............. 5 3 2 20
Warwicks 8-2 at home and the
Club. Provided each member pays
Stroud ............ 5 2 3 20
Juniors in Div 3C, still unbeaten,
the air fare it is an expense-free
Newent ........... 5 0 5 6
beat Warwicks seconds 7-3.
experience.
Phyllis Lauder, who has been the
Essex Veteran Match Secretary for
very many years, was recently in­
vited to watch a Schildkrot British
League match. It was after meeting
John Prean at the Pitsea Leisure
Centre. She refused, confessing that
she was not an admirer of the fast,
all-attack game. She much prefers
the pace and guile exhibited by
Veteran match-play.
It will be interesting to hear her
views and comments on the play and
the people she will see in New Delhi.
The Essex County Schools In­
dividual Championships will be held
on Saturday 14th March 1987. The
organiser Mrs Esther Coleman has
obtained sponsorship from Macart­
ney and Dowie Financial Services
Ltd. Telephone: 0277 74036.
Could this be Alf hard at work?
The Championships will be held
at the new Peniel Academy Sports
Hall, 49 Coxtie Green Road,
Pilgrims Hatch, Essex CMI4 5PS.
Three weeks earlier Peniel
David Cosway
Academy will host the Brentwood
BACK into the County A team,
has allowed Winton to draw level on
& District League's Junior 'Closed'
points. North B lead the first divi­
Championships. A huge entry of 60 Graham Toole inspired a 7-3 win
over Hertford with two single wins.
sion after beating a weakened GPO
Under-17 year olds owes much to
Ramish Bhalla and Mark Wilding
A 8/2 to overtake their closest
Coaches within the League and the
rivals. Good to have news from
Tournament Committee of each won a singles while Cheryl But­
Portsmouth! At the end of the first
tery and Sarah Hammond won their
Margaret Darnell, Sally Shepherd,
half Generation Aces lead the first
singles and combined to win the
Ted Knight and Peter Roden, who
doubles. Although the veterans A division by a single point from
will Referee both events at Peniel
Hambledon with Cowplain Gold
team lost heavily in all four en­
Academy.
counters over the block match. and Blue teams close behind.
The Ramlosa Silver Award is a
weekend they picked up a few useful
Unbeaten Colts lead the second clivi­
good idea! At each home match of sets against highly.ranked op­
sion from Co-Op Dukes and
Team Ramlosa Essex a guest ad­
ponents. Against Sussex- the 217. "'Schroder A.
judicator will award the player,
defeat included wins for Ken .Gi.les
Some upsets in the Hampshire
from either team, who in his or her
over. A Rowden and for ChTIS~Ine Junior Closed with number I seed
opinion has made the most signifi­
Davle~ over B Bayfor.d. AgaInst
Greg Moore and number 2 Jason
cant contribution to the match.
Ch~sh.ITe (217) Ken G~les beat. E
Hicks going out at the group stage
It does not necessarily follow that
Gn~fl.th and com bIDed with and number 3 Bryant Gonsalves los­
the nomination for the British
ing to Mark Thorne in the quarter
C~nstIne to beat no less. a pa~tnerLeague 'Man of the Match' is the
sh.lp than the two Scho.flelds In ~he
finals. Jeff Giles took out number
mixed.
Ray
Lush
had
hiS
glory
WInS
. .
same player.
aginst
Kent
(217)
when
he
beat
H
5
s«:ed Edward Connell In the semI.
Guests have so far come from
Buist and combined with George ThIS le~t the numbers 4 and 7 seeds
other sporting spheres: Roy Dwight
~ontestmg the fi~al and clearly rank­
Philpott to beat Buist and Fairley in
(Football); Mark Cox, MBE (Ten­
mg changes are Imnunant. ~Ithough
the doubles. George won the only
nis); Tosh Chamberlain (Football);
from .my own Clu? and City! was
set in the 118 loss to Lincoln beating
Darren Hall (Badminton) and Peter
B Allison. The veteran B team went
surpnsed at MartIn Johnson s ex­
Edwards (Essex County Cricket
down heavily 0/9 to Berkshire. A
cellent form. to win this event. It just
Club Secretary/Manager).
shows MartIn the standards 70U ca~
disappointing 4/6 defeat to
The' following have been made
Wiltshire Juniors with the girls
reach when you put your mInd to It
winners: Miss Lesley Tyler, Alex
Rachel Cheffey and Lisa Rice win­
and give 100% effort - well done!
Abbott, Richard Darnell, Stuart
ning their 3 but Bryant Gonsalves
In the girls event played on a group
Gibb and Gary Spencer. There are
won the only Boys singles.
basis No I seed Lisa Rice emerged
still two more Ramlosa Silver
In the Bournemouth Premier divi­
the unbeaten winner but Elizabeth
Awards to be made - who will
sion Merton A lead but a loss to
Schubrook beat No 2 seed Rachel
receive them .... could it be you!
North A and a draw with Kinson A
Cheffey to take second place.
HAMPSHIRE
IEnglish Records
ENGLISH NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP RECORDS
the last 28 years
1966-67 Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
1967-68 Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
1968-69 Miss J. Williams (Surrey)
1969-70 Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
1970-71 Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
1971-72 Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
1972-73 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1973-74 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1974-75 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1975-76 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1976-77 Miss C. Knight (Cleve)
1977-78 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1978-79 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1979-80 Miss C. Knight (Cleve)
1980-81 Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
1981-82 Miss C. Knight (Cleve)
1982-83 Miss K. Witt (Berks)
1983-84 Miss A. Gordon (Berks)
1984-85 Miss L. Bellinger (Beds)
1985-86 Miss J. Grundy (Lanes)
1986-87 Miss F. Elliot (Staffs)
. EVERY YEAR the programmes at the English Championships
contain the fascinating lists of past winners. We thought it would
be an idea to print them in TIN, giving principally our senior
readers some nostalgic material and showing the youngsters who
were the top people in the last 28 years in England.
MEN'S SINGLES
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78
1978-79
1979-80
1980-81
1981-82
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
B.R. Merrett (Glos)
1.0. Harrison (Glos)
R.J. Stevens (Essex)
G.c. Barnes (Essex)
G.c. Barnes (Essex)
G.C. Barnes (Essex)
D. Neale (Yorks)
1.0. Harrison (Glos)
D. Neale (Yorks)
D. Neale (Yorks)
D. Neale (Yorks)
G.C. Barnes (Essex)
T. Taylor (Essex)
T. Taylor (Essex)
G.C. Barnes (Essex)
D. Neale (Cleve)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Neale (Cleve)
P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)
D. Douglas (Warks)_.
D. Douglas (Warks)
WOMEN'S DOUBLES
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78
197&-79
1979-80
1980-81
1981-82
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
Miss D. Rowe (Middx) and Miss J. Rook (Surrey)
Mrs E. Carrington and Mrs J. McCree (Essex)
Mrs A.R. Mills and Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
Miss D. Rowe (Middx) and Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
Miss D. Rowe (Middx) and Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
Miss D. Rowe (Middx) and Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
Miss K. Smith (Middx) and Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
Miss K. Smith (Middx) and Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
Mrs J. Billington and Mrs E. Carrington (Essex)
Miss J. Heaps (Cheshire) and Mrs P. Piddock (Kent)
Mrs K. Mathews (Middx) and Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
Mrs K. Mathews (Middx) and Miss J. Shirley (Bucks)
Mrs K. Mathews (Middx) and Mrs J. Hammersley (Bucks)
Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
Miss C. Knight (Cleve) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
Miss C. Knight (Cleve) and Miss A. Stevenson (Leics)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks) and Mrs L.C. Jarvis (Cleve)
Miss C. Knight (Cleve) and Miss A. Stevenson (Leics)
Mrs J.P. Hammersley-Parker (Bucks) and Miss K. Witt (Berks)
Miss A. Gordon (Berks) and Mrs M. Sainsbury (Berks)
Miss L. Bellinger (Beds) and Miss J. Bellinger (Beds)
Miss J. Grundy (Lanes) and Miss J. Parker (Lanes)
Miss L. Bellinger (Beds) and Miss J. Bellinger (Beds)
WOMEN'S SINGLES
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
Miss D~'Rewe (Middx)_
Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
MEN'S DOUBLES
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78
1978-79
1979-80
1980-81
1981-82
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
J .A .. Leach. (Essex) and M.H. Thornhill (Middx)
1.0. Harrison (Glos) and B.R. Merrett (Glos)
R.F. Raybould (Essex) and R.J. Stevens (Essex)
R.F. Raybould (Essex) and R.J. Stevens (Essex)
D.O. Creamer (Middx) and J.A. Leach (Essex)
G.C. Barnes (Essex) and 1.0. Harrison (Glos)
d.c. Barnes (Essex) and 1.0. Harrison (Glos)
G.C. Barnes (Essex) and 1.0. Harrison (Glos)
G.C. Barnes (Essex) and 1.0. Harrison (Glos)
A. Hydes and D. Neale (Yorks)
A. Hydes and D. Neale (Yorks)
G.C. Barnes and T. Taylor (Yorks)
D. Neale and T. Taylor (Yorks)
A. Hydes and D. Neale (Yorks)
A.A.J. Barden (Middx) and P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks) and D. Neale (Cleve)
D. Douglas (Warks) and D. Neale (Cleve)
P.E. Day (Cambs) and A.A.J. Barden (Middx)
D. Douglas (Warks) and J. Walker (Cleve)
P. Day (Cambs) and N. Jarvis (Cleve)
D. Douglas (Warks) and P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks) and P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks) and P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks) and P.E. Day (Cambs)
D. Douglas (Warks) and C. Prean (loW)
D. Douglas (Warks) and C. Prean (loW)
S. Andrew (Essex) and N. Mason (Surrey)
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78
1978-79
1979-80
1980-81
1981-82
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
J.A. Leach (Essex) and Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
M. Maclaren (Surrey) and Miss M. Piper (Surrey)
J.A. Leach (Essex) and Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
B.D. Wright (Middx) and Miss M. Shannon (Surrey)
1.0. Harrison (Glos) and Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
G.C. Barnes (Essex) and Miss D. Rowe (Middx)
B.D. Wright (Middx) and Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
S.R. Gibbs (Essex) and Miss B. Sayer (Essex)
D. Neale (Yorks) and Miss K. Smith (Middx)
D. Neale (Yorks) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
D. Neale (Yorks) and Mrs M. Wright (Surrey)
G.C. Barnes (Essex) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
D. Neale (Yorks) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
A. Hydes (Yorks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
D. Neale (Yorks) and Mrs K. Mathews (Middx)
N. Jarvis (Cleve) and Mrs J.P. Hammersley (Bucks)
D. Douglas (Warks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
P.E. Day (Cambs) and Miss M. Ludi (Yorks)
N.A.S. Eckersley (Ches) and Miss K. Witt (Berks)
D. Douglas (Warks) and Miss L.C. Howard (Surrey)
J. Hilton (Lanes) and Mrs J. Hammersley (Bucks)
D. Douglas (Warks) and Mrs L.C. Jarvis (Cleve)
D. Dquglas (Warks) and Mrs L.C. Jarvis (Cleve)
N. Eckersley (Ches) and Miss J.Grundy (Lanes)
S. Andrew (Essex) and Mrs C. Moore (Cleve)
G. Sandley (Herts) and Miss A. Gordon (Berks)
S. Andrew (Essex) and Miss F. Elliot (Staffs)
S. Andrew (Essex) and Miss F. Elliot (Staffs)
MIXED DOUBLES
21
I County Notes 3
HERTFORDSHIRE
HUNTINGDONSHIRE
ISLE OF WIGHT
LEICESTERSHIRE
John Wood
David Deller
Brian Lamerton
Terry Bown
FL YING the flag for Wales and
Hertfordshire was Cheshunt's Nigel
Tyler, at the World Championships
in New Delhi during February.
Nigel, who is a professional table
tennis player sponsored by Donic,
has played for Wales for the past
five years since he was 14, during
which time he played at the World
Championships in Sweden and the
European Championships in
Prague.
Young Tyler also plays for But­
terfly Cardiff in the Premier Divi­
sion of the British League, and with
his sister Lesley and John Lennon
for Phoenix in the local Barnet
League.
Nigel's sister Lesley also plays for
Wales, but unfortunately they are
not sending a Womens Team to the
World Championships.
Lesley has played for Wales for
the past six years and represented
her country at the 1984 Moscow and
1986 Prague European Champion­
ships, as well as the World Cham­
pionships in Sweden and the World
University Games in Poland in 1984.
Lesley also plays in the British
League, with Ellenborough in the
Third Division South.
HUNTS table tennis is enjoying it's
most successful season yet, with
thirteen gains from the thirteen
county fixtures to date. The juniors
are riding high with wins over
Cambs., Oxfordshire, Norfolk firsts
and seconds, plus our own junior se­
cond team, who in turn have record­
ed two good wins in the initial
season. The senior team are also
unbeaten after their opening two en­
counters, whilst both veteran teams
are showing signs of success. Long
gone are the days when our county
senior team played for most of the
sixties without a win to their credit.
The St. Neots club held a
christmas get together (pictured a
number of the clubs younger players
plus coaches and senior players).
The group held a coaching session
in the morning, with matches dur­
ing the latter part of the day. Ob­
viously a good days table tennis was
had by all.
Forms are now available for the
St. Ives Inter Club team tournament
which will be played over the
weekend of September 26thl27th.
Teams of three in age groups of
under 12, under 14 and under 17. 72
club teams representing 20 counties
entered last September. More infor­
mation plus forms can be obtained
from myself at 17 Tennyson
Avenue, St. Ives, Cambs. (St. Ives
0480 66607).
FIRST, on our first appearance in
these notes this season, congratula­
tions to John Prean on being elected
to the chairmanship of our National
Association. Your scribe, who is
both honoured and privileged to
follow John onto the National
Council, has also promised to bring
occasional news to these notes from
'over the water' - water which in­
cidentally has shrunk this season,
the new style ferries having reduc­
ed the journey time Portsmouth ­
Ryde to 12 minutes; not even time
for a cup of tea!
It was a happy party that made
the long journey back from
Hereford on February 7th. Our 6
sets to 4 victory was rather special
in that it was the first time without
either Carl or Jim Daly (almost
unbelievably retired) that we had
won a championship match and
every member of the team won a
singles; Steve Harris, Ralph Duke,
Sharon Urry, Chris Angus and
Heike Kulsdom; the latter two on
their debut. Further the team travell­
ed without either Roger Hookey or
Mike Turner who between them had
won 5 of the previously won 7 sets
this season; this from the round
robin trip to Southampton in Oc­
tober for a 5 all draw with Cornwall
II and a 8-2 defeat at the hands of
Hampshire II.
Last seasons Island champions
Sandown 'A' again lead our first
division and the 7-3 defeat of their
nearest rivals Shanklin 'A' should
see another set of medals for Roger
Hookey, Keith Taylor and Kevin
Attrill. Ironically the leading in­
dividual player, Steve Harris plays
for Sandown 'B'. Steve who has lost
once this season (to Keith Taylor)
has returned this season after a 'lay­
off' and it was decided not to
disturb a winning team.
MAY I open this month with sincere
apologies to those concerned for
missing last month's deadline. I can
offer no excuses for this lapse on my
part, plenty of reasons, but no
excuses.
With the last eight weeks of the
season being a particularly busy
period for both the County and City
associations, it would seem ap­
propriate to inform you of the
various tournaments that are taking
place.
Sunday the 8th of March is the
date for the Rose Johnson
Memorial Trophy which is being
staged at the Knighton Park T.T.C.
commencing at 3.30 p.m. This will
be the 26th consecutive year that this
ladies handicap competition will
have been staged and also the 26th
year that Audrey Watson has been
the organiser. A truly marvellous
achievement. It has always amazed
me that this tournament rarely at­
tracts more than 25 or so entrants
but, nevertheless, those ladies that
do enter thoroughly enjoy the occa­
sion and Audrey's teas have to be
sampled to be believed.
The Leicester League's Closed
Championships take place on Sun­
day March 15th and will take
somewhere in the region of 10 hours
to complete the thirteen scheduled
events. Last season this tournament
attracted it's biggest entry in
anyone's living memory with well
over 300 entrants. Naturally the
Leicester League are hoping to do
even better this year. The tables for
these championships are borrowed,
having suitably insured, from clubs
within the League. The shifting to
and fro of these tables therefore is
an arduous task in anyone's
language, so I would like to thank
in advance the incredible work of
that intrepid duo, Mike James and
Terry Yeomanson, for their hard
work in organising this vital part of
the tournament.
The Hinckley Leisure Centre is
the setting for this season's
Leicestershire Closed which is to
take place on Sunday March 22nd.
After last year's non-event it was
reassuring to learn that with a great
deal of hard work by the County
Chairman, Mike Holt, that this
year's event would take place. To
cut costs etc., the tournament is to
run in conjunction with the Hin­
ckley League's own Closed Cham­
pionships. A super idea but it will
mean, due to the time factor, a few
events will be cut from the normal
schedule. The Hinckley firm,
BYRON ROOFING & CLAD­
DING, are sponsoring not only this
year's event, but also for a further
2 years to the tune of well over £300.
Welsh International Nigel Tyler
League leaders
Sandown 'A'
Shanklin 'A'
Rookley'A'
Sandown 'B'
Newport
Vics 'A'
Ryde School 'A'
Pts
13 13
12 II
13 7
II 6
o
o
2
2
I 41
4 32
3 27
13
13
2
3
5 27
6 24
6
4
0 51
The Island junior championship,
held at Wroxall turned out to be an
Urry family benefit with Ian and
Sharon, both of Rockley winning
the under 17 singles events and com­
bining to win the 'open' doubles.
Singles runners-up were Barnie Ely
(Cowes H.S.) and Nicky Porteous
(Ryde). The cadet champion is
Mathew Roberts (Shanklin) and the
intermediate (non first division) win­
ner was the unseeded Graham
Hughes (Haven Street) who won the
hard way, defeating the numbers I,
2 & 3 seeds.
22
ICounty Notes 4
NORTHUMBERLAND
SURREY
Pauline Long
Frank Hams
THE freeze-up during the week
preceding January 17 prevented
both the seniors travelling to
Cheshire and the juniors entertain­
ing Cumbria in their County mat­
ches, and had the veterans not
already played their home match in
November at Essex II's request, this
fixture would surely have suffered
the same fate.
Happily the weather conditions
had vastly improved by the time the
February 7 matches were played.
The seniors, minus Peter McQueen
due to a shoulder injury, beat
Worcestershire 7-3, with Eddie
Smith, Neil McMaster and Ian
Robertson all gaining maximums in
singles and doubles. Unusually,
Clare Mouzon and Caron Guthrie
failed to win a set between them!
The juniors lost their first match
of the season in the local derby away
to Durham. The two Stephens,
Coverdale and Penman, each won
a singles, and Penman and Michael
Curry took the boys' doubles, but
no further sets were forthcoming
meanwhile, the veterans travelled to
meet Leicestershire with high hopes
of success against a team who had
yet to record their first victory.
However, after a dream start, with
wins from Fred Short and Larry
Cartmell to put the visitors 2-0 up,
the home team got into their stride
and it was not until the very last set
that Maurice Cheek gained Nor­
thumberland's third victory. This
result was extremely disappointing
after some very encouraging perfor­
mances earlier in the season.
The Northumberland League
representative teams both advanced
to the next round of their respective
competitions. The Wilmott Cup
team of Smith, McMaster and
Robertson whitewashed Stockton
5-0 to win the regional area final and
are now in the quarter-finals, where
they are due to travel to either Traf­
ford or Bolton. In the Rose Bowl,
Clare Mouzon (2), Margaret Morley
(2) and Karen Wilkinson (I) drop­
ped only one set to score a 5-1 vic­
tory over Ormesby. The men's
veteran team of Short, Cheek and
Cartmell entered their team com­
petition for the first time, but had
to fight all the way to win a 5-4
thriller at York, with Short taking
all three sets and Cheek two.
Byker CC 'A' kept up their title
challenge in the Premier Division of
the Northumberland League with
wins over Electrics •A' and
Gateshead •A'. Eddie Smith and
Jeremy Musselwhite were both
unbeaten in the first match while
Musselwhite, Maurice Cheek and
Michael Thomas scored two wins,
each plus the doubles in the 7-3 vic­
tory over Gateshead. Blaydon Y.C.
'A', leaders of Div. I also con­
solidated their position with a 7-3
win at home to Byker C.C. 'C'.
Alan Matthewson (3), Dave Watson
(2), Tom Hagan (I) and the doubles
made up their sets total.
I HOPE most of you who read last
month's notes realised that they
were written in early December for
the January issue and were printed
a month late. Anyway I have to
thank Nicky Mason for making one
of my predictions happen almost
before it was written. By winning
the South of England 3 Star tour­
nament he became one of a very few
Surrey players who have won our
local tournament. Dave Hannah lost
last year but can anyone tell me Sur­
rey's last winner, man or lady - or
come to that any other 3 star
tournament?
After being beaten by Bucks 8-1
the veterans welcomed Middlesex II
knowing on paper it looked a dif­
ficult game. But Connie Warren
changed all that by making his
debut. We assumed he would win
two. He did. We assumed that
whoever he played doubles with they
would win. They did. He inspired
Gordon Chapman to play his best
match for Surrey and with Brian
Simmonds and Jennie Vass we won
8-1. Even after this win, however,
the veterans have a problem - we
haven't got a venue. The "official"
home for our County matches is
now no longer available to us if two
other matches are being played on
the same day. In the past we have
been able to play in the evening but
this is now no longer at our disposal.
Let's hope that next season's fixture
list can be arranged so that only one
other team is at home. Even so if we
do play at home we can't now get
a cup of tea so I'm indebted to
'Vourne Simmonds for supplying
the kettle and making the tea in the
Middlesex game and for the players
supplying the food.
The unbeaten Vetts II team
travelled to Brighton to play the
only other unbeaten team, Sussex,
in a top of the table clash. Any luck
that was going apparently went
against us; quite a few games were
lost at deuce and eventually we lost
2-7. Dave Crowley, Mike Pearson
(I), Ron Laughiem (I) and Barbara
Winn played for us.
David Lomas has advised me that
the Surrey School's Individual
Tournament are due to take place
at the Crystal Palace Sports Centre
(indoor cricket school) on Sunday
22nd March. Play will commence at
9.15 a.m. and finish about 5.00 p.m.
John Wright is the referee and
anyone umpiring sets will receive a
refreshment voucher of 20p per set.
Norman Hooper is now organis­
ing our inter-league competitions.
Croydon Business Houses league are
defending the Percy Johnson Cup
(3 men). The Harding Cup (2 men
and I woman) and The Sutton
Trophy (2 boys and I girl) have not
been played for several seasons but
now make a welcome return. All
competitions are now almost com­
pleted and the finals of the Sutton
Trophy will take place on Saturday
28th March at Tweedale School.
SUSSEX
John Woodford
THE SCHILDKROT British
League continue~ in its role, many
would say of the cuckoo in the nest
of England table tennis event
organisers.
In Sussex, virtually every event,
large and small is threatened in some
way of losing top players because of
clashes with the two Sussex British
League clubs fixtures. But, it is not
only their fixtures as scheduled, it
is the fact that throughout the
British League matches are being
postponed and played on other
dates.
The 14 Sundays now booked for
British League has because of
postponements become 20 Sundays
and that is most of the season. I
have a lot of sympathy for tourna­
ment organisers and especially
where sponsorship is involved ­
sponsors want the top players in­
volved for their money's worth but
it is just not working out that way
- further proof is the growing list of
tournament cancellations now being
carried in this magazine.
Most absurd of all is the rule that
allows British League clubs to
postpone matches because of being
one (star) player short. I for one
would like to know the name of the
person who put the rule forward ­
no doubt trying to protect sponsors.
Sussex is claiming two mid-season
successes - the comparitively huge"
crowd of a thousand present at
Crawley Leisure Centre for the
Triumph Adler English National
Championships and the fact that
r------------,
Stephen Moore, eldest of the Sussex
Moore family from Bexhill is cur­
rently ranked No. 50 on the
England list.
veterans table tennis is still boom­
ing. Veterans are falling over
themselves to enter the newi&h range
of veterans events and even Sussex
veterans have finished second to
Cheshire in the premier division of
the county championships.
The .team for the vets week-end
matches had two star players - Andy
Meads and Robin Stace. Meads, the
Crawley schoolmaster taught his op­
ponents a thing or two with eight
wins, with England No 5 Stace on
the ball with his heavy top-spin win­
ning six times.
WARWICKSHIRE
Jenny Heaton
PRIDE was felt by all Birmingham
and Warwickshire players and of­
ficials when the news of Des
Douglas' triumph in the European
Top 12 was received. No one
deserves it more than Des, as he is
one of the hardest working and
most dedicated of players. A great
example to everyone.
Warwickshire Closed
This was held'at the West Midland
Centre for the disabled in Coventry
on 8th February.
Phil Gunn (Birmingham) was
unstoppable in the mens singles
event and played well all day. He
chopped his way to the final but
then hit against Barry Johnson (Bir­
mingham) to win the "title comfor­
tably. Last year's surprise winner,
Mike Browne, lost in the semis to
Barry.
The Ladies singles final was a
repeat of last year's final and had
the same result when Sandra
Peakman (Birmingham) beat Di St.
Ledger (Birmingham). Di did go on
to win the ladies doubles with Sue
Culbertson. Sandra nearly took the
mixed title with partner Lester Ber­
tie but was denied this by Kevin
Pilgrim and Lyn Brison (Coventry).
In the absence of Leigh Jeffries,
Darren Smith (Birmingham) took
the U 17 title beating Raj Singh (Bir­
mingham) in the final but Raj did
get some consolation when he won
the junior boys doubles with part­
ner Dave Ameghino.
Alison Ledwitch (Birmingham)
dominated the girls U 17 event
defeating Nicola Meddings (Birm­
ingham) comfortably in the final.
Nicola, however, won the cadet girls
singles which was played on a group
basis and Dave Clarke (Coventry)
won the cadet boys title.
I hope to include results of the
Coventry Closed in the next issue.
County Teams
All matches due to be played on
17th January were cancelled because
of the dreadful weather but it looks
as if it will take more than bad
weather to stop our Vets team win­
ning division 3B. The Junior A team
are still in with a chance of gaining
promotion but the Senior A team
continues to struggle.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 37
23
I Lancashire/Cheshire
& South West Leagues
SWEET SUCCESS
Lancashire and
and Cheshire
League
by George R. Yates
FLEETWOOD, now deprived of
the services of Steve Mills on his
relocation in Kent, would appear to
have blown their expectations of the
first division championship title
when, at home to Warrington, they
were beaten 6-4.
Two wins each for Peter Flint and
Terry Turner, plus a solo from
veteran Jack Evans against junior
Paul Borrett and the doubles
brought about this disastrous result
for the seasiders whose Brian
Carney won three but only sup­
plemented by one from Steve
Bevan.
This result brought joy to the
Bolton camp who, with just one
point dropped - to Fleetwood ­
would now seem on course to retain
their title with two home matches re­
maining against Trafford and
Stockport.
The first Connacht Open titles ever won by Connacht players. Terry Dolan
(left) won the Mixed Doubles (with Jennifer Reid) and Sean Spelman won
the Boys Singles (A & S Roofing Shield).
Photograph by Joe Shaughnessy 091-67251
Jill Hammersley-Parker
Table Tennis Foundation
THE main purpose of this article is to thank most sincerely the
people and organisations who have joined or rejoined the
Foundation.
So far this season I have received over 60 new or renewed
memberships from players, ex players, coaches, parents, en­
thusiasts, officials, leagues, national league clubs, counties,
businesses etc. Should you fall into any of these categories and
would like to help our young potential stars gain invaluable in­
ternational experience then you could join tl:1e Foundation by
donating £10 (payable to Jill Hammersley-Parker T.T. Foun­
da.tion) and sent to The Barn, Commqn Bank, Dolphinholme,
Lancaster LA2 9AN.
Carl Prean won a challenge match on the Isle of Wight and
donated the £100 he won to the Foundation. Desmond Douglas
opened a school exhibition and donated his fee to the Founda­
tion. Support such as this from our top players is very much
appreciated.
With the money raised so far we have plans to attend two
international tournaments and hopefully if more money is forth­
coming this can be increased to three. Please note that any
recommendations for selections by members should be made
in writing to myself and these will be considered by the Foun­
dation selection committee.
JILL HAMMERSLEY-PARKER
The Barn
Common Bank
Dolphinholme
Lancaster, Lancs.
~ LA29AN
24
f
Bolton
Fleetwood
Stockport
Warrington
Oldham
Trafford
Liverpool
Manchester
PW
5 4
5 3
5 3
5 3
5 2
5 2
5 1
5 0
D
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
I
LFA P
16 9
I 32 18 7
2 29 21 6
2 29 21 6
2 21 29 5
3 23 27 4
4 24 26 2
4 8 42 1
o 34
Last season's demotees, Blackburn
and Bury, are both on course for a
speedy return to the top flight
neither having yet been beaten
although Bury, in Division 2 (South)
dropped a point to Stockport A and
much could depend on the result of
their final match away to
Macclesfield.
Division 2 (South)
PWDLFAP
Bury
5 4 1 0 35 15 9
Macclesfield 4 3 1 0 25 15 7
Liverpool A 5 2 1 2 24 26 5
Farnworth 5 2 0 3 24 26 4
Division 2 (North)
PWDLFAP
Blackburn 5 5 0 0 40 10 10
Wirral
5 3 1 I 27 23 7
Burnley
5 1 3 I 26 24 5
Blackpool 4 2 I 1 23 17 5
Oldham hold pole position in both
the women's and junior first divi­
sions but just one set elevates
Oldham from Liver pool in the top
female division, the respective front
line teams being: Mandy Goodwin,
Carey Whitehead and Marjorie Rid­
dle for Oldham, and Paula French,
Barbara Kirkman and Brenda
Buoey (nee Williams) for Liverpool.
Oldham
Liverpool
Crewe
Warrington
PWDLFAP
4 4 0 0 32 8 8
4 4 0 0 31 9 8
5 2 I 2 26 14 5
5 2 1 2 25 25 5
Both Oldham and Stockport boast
nine points from five matches in the
junior first division, the point being
dropped when the two sides met on
December 12.
In this vital encounter Stockport
had a treble winner in Jonathon
Taylor with Michael Parker supply­
ing the other two as against two for
Darryl Sneyd, one each for Wayne
Renton and James Bradbury, and
the doubles won by Renton and
Sneyd.
PW D LFA P
Oldham
5 4 1 040 10 9
Stockport 5 4 1 o 33 17 9
Preston
5 3 0 2 34 16 6
Wirral
5 3 0 2 26 24 6
Bury
5 2 1 2-2228 5
South West
regional leagues
COMPETITION in the South
West's highly successful leagues has
reached very interesting positions at
the halfway stage. Swindon
veterans' slender lead over Global
Plymouth may well disappear when
they clash on February 22nd, but
shared points could let in Bristol or
Exeter just two points behind.
West Cornwall still reign supreme
top of the Cadet league and 12
points clear of Bournemouth, but
with tough matches to come against
Bristol, Launceston and Global
Plymouth, will need to stay on top
form if they are to lift the cup from
last year's winners Bristol A.
South West Veterans League
(posi tions at 25-1-87)
RI R2 R3 R4 FA
I Swindon
5 5 9 6 25 15
2 Bristol Sports
4 8 5 6 23 17
3 Exeter H.
7 9 4 3 23 17
4 W. Cornwall
8 4 5 5 22 18
5 Global Sports
5 5 4 8 22 18
6 Nailsea
4 4 6 3 17 23
7 Launceston
2 I 3 4 10 30
8 Knightstone
I 0 0 I 2 38
Leading individual scores
Played Won
B. Powel (Swindon)
12
12
B. Davis (Global Sports)
6
6
D. Bazell (Exeter)
12
9
G. May (Global Sports)
12
9
R. Smith (Bristol Sports)
12
9
P. Dominey (Bristol Sports) 12
8
M. White (W. Cornwall)
12
8
J. Bright (Swindon)
12
8
P. Butterworth (Nailsea)
12
8
South West Regional Cadets League
(positions at 25-1-87)
P -F A
I West Cornwall
6 50 4
2 Bournemouth
6 38 16
3 Global Sports
6 38 16
4 Inter-City A
6 38 16
5 Bristol
5 36 9
6 Gloucester
6 34 20
7 Launceston A
4 27 9
8 Swindon
3 21 6
9 Coombe Dean
6 20 34
10 Devon and Torbay
5 16 29
11 Inter-City B
6 16 38
12 Holymead A
6 14 40
13 Launceston B
4 9 27
14 Chilton Trinity
2 6 12
15 Mendip
5 3 42
16 Holymead B
6 3 51
Leading individual scores
Played Won
J. Menzel (W. Cornwall)
18
18
M. Rushton (W. Cornwall) 18
17
R. Plummer (W. Cornwall) 18
15
R. Moore (Gloucester)
18
14
J. Shipman (Inter-City A)
18
14
M. Piper (Inter-City)
18
14
ICoaching 1
TWO YEARS TO THE TOP
INTER VIEW between Les Darcy and Rowden Fullen, ETTA two
star coach and chief trainer at the Wakefield Dunlop Centre ­
players from this centre won 73 open titles in 1985/86 season and
in the current season have so far captured 33 titles. Rowden has
been involved in the coaching of a number of England-ranked
players including the last three successive No. 1 cadet girls.
Les: I recall quite clearly that you
first noticed Joanna Roberts at our
August course in 1984. She was
pretty much a beginner then.
Rowden: Jo had actually been
brought to me a year or so before
that - a young player has to be
ready to be coached, at that time she
wasn't.
Les: What was it that moved you to
include her in the Wakefield Dunlop
squad? Was she very talented?
Rowden: I don't set. much store by
talent. Jo was gutsy and determin­
ed and still is - she just doesn't
realise when she is beaten.
o
Les: I am sure many coaches would
be interested in the programme
which has turned a virtual beginner
in August '84 into England No.1 today. J understand that this season
she has won just about everything:
4 two star titles, 3 titles at the
Cleveland, the England junior clos­
ed, the national ranking trial and
even a bronze in the junior trials.
Rowden: If I am honest about it I
feel that many coaches in this coun­
try play at coaching. To produce
good players requires a systematic
and professional approach all the
time, both in squad and one to one
situations - plus back-up at all ma­
jor events and a clear line of
development in areas such as style
and specialisation. J 0 is solid in the
five basic areas. Technically her
strokeplay is simple and direct, tac­
tically she is able to vary her game
to cope with differing opponents,
stylewise she knows how she should
play and adheres to her own game
plan, physically she is durable and
Joanna Roberts - determination and commitment could lead her to fur­
ther success.
Official Drink for the
England Team
Orange or Lemon Flavour
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4509 makes 6Iitres*£4 99
*(includes P&P)
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Send Cheque or Postal Order to:­
MASONLINE LIMITED, Myr~e House,
.Goose Rye Road, Worplesdon, Surrey GU3 3RJ.
FOR PLAYERS WITH TASTE
lasts well over a long event, mentally
she is strong and has good concen­
tration. In addition she plays with
the equipment best suited to her
game.
rubbers most ideally suited her
game. Linda obviously had an eye
for a good player.
Les: I thought most rubbers were
pretty standard nowadays.
Les: If a coach has to work in all
these areas which do you consider
most important?
Rowden: True, but quite a few are
just a little spongy and more suited
to the topspin game. If you think
Rowden: All champions must be
about it most girls are drive players,
strong mentally. I feel style is the. and the Donic rubbers being that bit
next important consideration.
sharper and with good wood effect
Players must be true to their own
complemen!. Jo's natural style.
style and play the sort of game their
Les: What particular blade and rub­
instincts tell them is right for them
bers does she use?
- otherwise sooner or later they will
crack up. This means unfortunate­
Rowden: Vario 2.0mm on the
ly specialising quite early for the bet­
forehand and Slick 1.5mm on the
ter younger players and equally un­
backhand on a Carboplay blade ­
fortunately some styles are more ac­
this combination is a little fast but
ceptable at international level than
gives her good stability back from
others.
the table atid good power against the
better junior players, where she
Les: You mentioned equipment.
needs that bit extra help from the
What does Jo use?
equipment.
Rowden: Jo plays with Donic which
is promoted by Jarvis Sports in this
country. I arranged sponsorship
through Linda Jarvis last summer
when we found out that the Donic
Les: I am aware from past ex­
perience that you know your equip­
ment but do you think this should
be tailored to the individual player?
CONTINUED ON PAGE 36
25
ICoaching 2
COACHING COMMENT'S FROM CRAWLEY
by Tony Russe
THE two day event of the English Senior Closed provides an
excellent opportunity for coaches to study our top players at
close quarters. All the player's attributes are on display, techni­
que, temperament and physical and mental fitness.
This year was a cracker. I came
away with the feeling that we are
really on the way up again. For one
thing the crowd support on both
days was excellent and the spectators
were not disappointed by the
players. Here we were able to see
our players performing 'best of
five', being tested in the same way
as some of the players were to ex­
perience in Delhi. It is interesting to
see how various players pace
themselves over the five. Obvious­
ly everyone would like to 'go for it'
three straight but the best laid plans
can come unstuck. It needs a good
temperament to deliver the business
over five and this was seen quite
clearly it the early rounds and dur­
ing the finals stages.
The standard of play is, I believe,
also improving. One can only guage
by how our best players are tested
and here there are indications that
some of our senior players are clos­
ing the gap on the best. The most
eye catching performance in the
Mens' event was the semi-final clash
between Desmond Douglas and
Skylet Andrew .. It was nail biting
stuff. Sky first leading 2-0, Des-
mond recovering to 2-2 and then a
tingling third which finally went to
Desmond during deuce. Sky had his
chance and felt that he had blown
it. In a way he had but probably not
in the way that he would think. One
of the criticisms of Sky in the past
is that having achieved a winning
position he would play safe, go
negative, and would lose a match
because of it. Sky has learned his
lesson, but at certain vital stages he
went ultra-positive and made
mistakes because of it. To continue
to make those sort of attacking
mistakes is also negative, because it
produces a negative result. The line
is very fine indeed and Sky put
everything into that game. He may
have lost the match but he would
have won a lot of new friends and
admirers, and there will be other
times.
Taking a line through Sky, what
about Matthew Syed's performance
in the quarters? He went down to
Sky 17 in the fifth. Much has
already been said about this talented
junior. All I can say is that I have
never seen an English chopper of his
age display such mastery of techni­
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26
Nicky Mason - victor over Carl Prean at Crawley.
Phoro Srephen Line 0273 453867
que and raw courage. Sky had to
their intentions.
throw everything at Matty, in­
The ladies too showed that they
cluding a little needle, and there
mean business. The semi-final bet­
really was nothing in it at the end.
ween Joy Grundy and Lisa Bellinger
Matty is gradually including an ex­
took on the shape of last year's final
cellent 'snap hit' technique from
but this time Lisa held her own and
both wings which will become
Joy had to give her best in the end.
stronger. He needs to acquire a lit­
But Joy put everything she had to
tle more variation in service and in
give into the game and let us hope
length of chop. He is working on
that she will fully recover from her'
these points and it is nit picking at
injury problems and soon return to
this stage of his development, but
her full form. So Lisa was looking
if you want to be the best etc. etc.
good, moving well, timing her chops
Bradley Billington caught the eye,
after some early mistakes, picking
taking out experienced Colin Wilson
out her winners in a positive way.
over five and so did young Sean
Gibson. Our No.4 junior came face
She was entitled to think that this
to face with Chris Rogers, who is a
year the title was hers.
good all round performer, with lots
Meanwhile in the other semi-final
of experience and a good game.
Alison Gordon was battling with
Sean went at him like a thing
Fiona Elliot. My initial impression
possessed and Chris wound up shak­
was that I have seen Ali playing bet­
ing his head and wondering what
ter. Later I came to believe that she
had hit him. When Sean's ex­
had been 'blotted out' by Fiona.
perience catches up with his game
Fiona was sharp, very sharp. Her
he is going to be quite a player.
game is technically very correct and
Another fine game was Nicky
she is a positive attacker on both
Mason's close win over Carl Prean
in the quarters. Mason is a grand . wings. At one time I thought that
she may be a little too correct in her
type who insists on doing things the
lines of play, keeping strictly to·the
'macho' way and it paid off. Carl
accepted percentages with no one­
worried his way over the five games
off shots that can pick up the big
and went negative at deuce in the
points. But I would not carp on this
fifth, both playing wise and I
performance, because having
suspect mentally. Nick was com­
pletely uninhibited, went for his
disposed of Ali, she then set out to
shots and carried the day. Carl is
'do' Lisa in no uncertain terms. She.
struggling in England at the mo­
never allowed Lisa into the game.
ment. The lads at home are really
I have never seen Fiona play so well.
starting to stoke up and there is no
Mentally she is excellent. She knows
easy ride whoever you are or
what to do and will not let anything
whatever your reputation. This is
district her. When that kind of
good and I am sure that everyone
temperament is allied to fine
would welcome this. And what of
strokeplay, anything is possible.
our champion, Des Douglas? He
What is more, Fiona put to rest the
will remember 1987 as the year he
whispers that she was at the Worlds
really had to earn his title. Not only
at Joy's expense only on sufferance.
did Sky extend him' fully bJ.lt so did
She is now there as of right. Go to
Alan Cooke in the final. Alan
it girl, you are a member of one of
fought back from 2-0 down to
the best squads that we have sent
square it at 2-2. I felt that Des just
abroad for some time. Success to
about deserved to win the fifth but,
my word, the lads have announced
you all.
IThe Pioneer in 1902
•
A weekly table tennis magazine In 1902!
by Gerald N. Gurney
HOW many of today's readers have
even heard of the Table Tennis and
Pastimes Pioneer, hereinafter The
Pioneer? The first issue of this
weekly journal appeared on 18
January, 1902, at the height of the
phenomenal craze for the new game
which was then sweeping across
Great Britain and much of Europe.
John Jaques and Son, already the
major manufacturers for the game,
reported at about this time that
1,500 or more of their boxed sets
were being sold every day.
Issues number I and 2 of The
Pioneer extended to only four
pages, but number 3 - aided by a
full-page advertisement for Ayres
(Jaques' major competitors) - show­
ed a 1()()0J0 increase. And already the
editor was claiming 20,000 readers,
though without disclosing the more
revealing figure of copies sold.
Astonishingly, this issue contains
nearly all the features of today's
magazine, lacking only "County
Notes" - there being no county set­
up at the time. This did not evolve
until the 1920s. The anonymous
editor made weekly appeals for
copy, but it had to arrive six days
before publication each saturday.
Coming events and tournament
reports were fully covered as well as
news from abroad, and a small piece
on "Hints to Players" appeared
each week. Advertisements and car­
toons soon made their demand for
space, and satirical comment, often
culled from newspapers, added to
the variety.
Correspondents were much
engaged - at this time when the Laws
were very unsettled - with the ser­
vice, the question of volleying and
"stonewalling" (pushing play). Ser­
vice during this period was direct
over the net but this gave far too
much dominance to the server, and
many games were won merely by
how the coin fell before the first ball
was even struck. Many ingenious
(and some bizarre) solutions were
offered by readers, (one of which ­
simply to allow the receiver a second
chance - might even be a useful ad­
dition to today's Laws.) Eventual­
ly the Ping-Pong Association in­
troduced the "double-bounce" ser­
vice which we know today, but the
rival Table Tennis Association con­
tinued as before.
The possible introduction of
volleying was much discussed and,
perhaps not surprisingly, was sup­
ported by a commentator in Lawn
Tennis - on the grounds that the
game needed more variety. But
volleying was never written into the
Laws.
Gerald Gurney will be pleased to
correspond with readers on any
aspect of the early history of table
tennis.
Debbie and Ian
lift six titles at
Pontefract
ENGLAND No. 4 junior Debbie
Toole of Normanton won three
titles at the Pontefract I-star Open.
Ian Robertson of Gateshead land­
ed the men's singles title, the men's
doubles and the Class 2 mixed
singles.
The major upset was the defeat
of Karen Burrows of Castleford, the
defending champion. She went
under in the first round of the
women's singles to Kathryn Bray of
Hull. Organiser was Mr E. Ward.
Results - MS: I Robertson b P
McQueen 19, 9. WS: D Toole b H
Kavanagh 16, -15, 10. MD:
Robertson/McQueen b M Stead/C
Render 17,7. WD: Toole/Burrows
bE Meddings/K Goodall 17, 10.
JBS: J Taylor b M Ward 17, 13.
JGS: Toole b Meddings 13, 17. XS:
Robertson b M Stead 18, 10. VS: C
Judson b R Norton - 12, 19, 8.
27
I Wales,
Scotland, Ireland, Schools
English Schools'
Irish Snippets
Table Tennis
by Francis Kennedy and Tony Martin
MANY eyebrows were raised at the
omission of Irish closed champion,
South County champion and
Munster open champion Kevin
Keane from the Irish team for the
world championships in New Delhi.
The team is Colum Slevin, Andrew
; Dennison, Hilton Meneally and Jim
Dill. A ladies team will not take
part.
There were a few upsets at the
Munster open 'in Cork, Terry Dolan
(ranked 15) defeated Anthony Red­
mona (9) and Jim Dill (7) before los­
ing to Hilton Meneally (3) in the
semi-final. Sean Spelman (10)
defeated Tom Heasley (6) before go­
ing out to Keane (4) in the other
semi-final. Keane added the
Munster title to the South County
which he won in October, defeating
Meneally in both finals.
Mens singles - Semi-finals: H
Meneely b T Dolan II, 20; K. Keane
b S Spellman II, 10. Final: K Keane
b H Meneely 9, 16.
Ladies singles - Semi-finals: J Reid
b G Redmond 16, -12, 19; N
McEvoy b C Leonard 17, 23. Final:
J Reid b N McEvoy 16, 14.
Ladies doubles final: Reid/McEvoy
b P Monaghan/S Akal 16, 17.
Mens doubles final: T Caffrey/C
Caggrey b Keane/O Molloy - 14,
18,20.
Mixed doubles final: Red­
mond/Akal b T Heasley/Reid 12,
'-20,20.
In the junior boys event top seeds
Sean Spellman, Gary Neilson and
Owen Molloy were all beaten in the
quarter-fina1s by Billy Marshall,
Darren Perris and Martin O'Flaher­
ty respectively. Marshall clinched
the title beating James Mullen,
Ireland's No. I cadet, in the final 14,
-16, 17.
Grainine Redmond won the cadet
and junior titles which adds up to
a very successful weekend for her,
and a bright future ahead of her.
Results
Junior boys final: B Marshall b J
Mullen 14, -16, 17. Cadet boys
final: J Mullen b J Langan 14, 15.
U12 boys final: R Gavin b M
Anderson 10, 16. Junior girls final:
G Redmond b 0 Stevenson 15,17.
Cadet girls final: G Redmond b A
Cooke 17, 11. U12 girls final: P Bar­
ton b J Davey 16, 16.
All-Ireland team tournament ­
Dublin
Sixteen of the top teams competed
in the All-Ireland team tournament
held in Dublin. Top seeded team,
Craigiovon. from Ulster won the ti­
tle after a very close and exciting
final, beating Galway 4-3. Galway
had to overcome a tenacious
challenge from Cameron Park in the
semi-final to .come out victors 4-3.
For the Inter-Provincial cham­
pionships in Limerick (February 13
and 14) Connacht applied to ITTA
for permission for Sean Spelman to
represent his province at both senior
and junior level (Junior Inter­
Provincials April 24th), but were
refused permission with only three
players from the western province
being ranked at senior level, Con­
nacht again having to field a weak
team.
The Irish junior team to travel to
the Derby Select on March 7th and
8th is as follows: U17: Sean
Spelman, Gary Nielson, Kirsteen
Stafford, Roslyn Comerford. U14:
James Mullan, Jim Langan,
Grainne Redmond, Imelda Fottrell.
U12: A. Byrne, P. Barton, N.
Strong, O. Redmond.
North Wales
table tennis
round-up
Wrexham Lager table tennis closed
tournament
HELD at Castell Alun· Sports Centre,
Hope, near Wrexham, 1st February.
Organised by the Wrexham & District
Table Tennis League.
Mens singles - Final: Justin Evans
(McAlpine Quarries) b Paul Griffiths
(McAlpine Quarries) - 14, 9, 13. Ladies
singles - Final: Joyce Jones (Malpas) b
Natasha Williams (Wrex OB) 18, 14.
Veterans singles - Final: Roy Williams
(Wrex OB) b Geoff Jones (Gresford) 13,
14. Handicap singles - Final: Neil James
(Telecom) b Roy Williams (Wrex OB)
42-30 (one game final). Division two
singles - Final: Williams b Kristian
Moulsdale (Telecom) 17, 9. Division
three singles - Final: Nigel Roberts
(Caergwrle BBO) b Gary Jones
(Caergwrle BB) 17, 13. Cadet boys
singles - Final: Spencer Harris (Caergwrle
BB) b Andrew Jones (Caergwrle BB) II,
13. Cadet girls singles - Final: Natasha
Williams (Wrex OB) b Susan Lees
(Castell Alun) 18, 7. Junior boys singles
. Final: Harris b Moulsdale 12, -13,15.
Junior girls singles - Final: Tracy Sam-
brook (Telecom) b Williams 18, - 17, 19.
Mens doubles - Final: Griffiths/Evans b
James/Hadyn Young (Telecom) 9, II.
Ladies doubles . Final: Jones/Cris
Watkins (Telecom) b Anne Walker/Bea­
ty Walker (Wrex Vic YC/WSCD) 12, 17.
Mixed doubles - Final: Walker/Jones b
Griffiths/Sambrook 18, 16. Junior
doubles - Final: HarrislJones b
Jones/Roberts 20, 10.
RDC Cup, team event· Final: James
Tapp/Evans (Telecom/McAlpine Quar­
ries) b Griffiths/Jones (McAlpine Quar­
ries/Caergwrle BB) 3-2.
Llandudno & District Table Tennis
League
Finals night held Saturday 31 January
1987, at the Queens Head, Llandudno.
Sponsored by Rhos County Garage.
Tournament referee Mr Ken Jones (in­
ternational umpire).
Senior singles - Semi-finals: Karl Har­
rison (CBTTC) b Llion Evans (CBTTC)
- 18, 19, 8; Arthur Roberts (Rowen) b
Don Hobbs (Llandegai) 19, 23. Final:
Roberts b Harrison - 16, 18, 18.
Division two championship - Final: Rob
Walker (CBTTC) b John Taylor
(Llanwrst) 18, -14, 18. Division three
championship - Final: Adrian Salisbury
(JK Smit) b Alan Pullin (CBTTC) 16, 19.
Veteran championship - Final: Karl Har­
rison (CBTTC) b Don Hobbs
(Llandegai) 10, -9, 17. Junior cham­
pionship . Final: Natasha Williams
(Cricket Club) b Steven Nicholls (Llan­
dudno YC) 16, 19. Ladies championship
- Final: Barbara Williams (CBTTC) b
Karen Ashton (Llandudno YC) 16, II.
Doubles championship - Final: Ray
Howland and Karl Harrison b Arthur
Roberts and Ken Jones 16, 19.
Official umpires: Dennis Hunt, John
Johnson, Bill Rushton, Marshall Smith,
Mike Steen, Ken Jones, Bill Curtis, Roy
Williams.
East Flintshire Table Tennis League
Closed Tournament
Held at Castell Alun Sports Centre,
Hope, near Wrexham. Tournament
organiser: Mr Harry Maddison, assisted
by Mr David Kay.
Mens singles - Semi-finals: Simon Jones
(BSC) bt Clive Parry (North West
District): Ivor Jones (BSC) b Dave Mor­
ris (North West District). Final: Simon
Jones (BSC) b Ivor Jones (BSC) 10, 20.
Mens doubles - Final: Richard
Lloyd/Simon Jones (BSC) b John
Bowen/Clive Parry (NW District) -18,
18, 13. Veteran singles - Final: Ivor Jones
(BSC) b John Bowen (NW District) 14,
13. Ladies singles: Justine Thomas
(Castell Alun) winner; Tracy McKeown
(Sealand YC) runner-up; event ran as
round robin. Division two singles - Final:
Russell Thomas (Hawarden) b Peter
Heath (Sealand YC) 18, 9. Mixed
doubles: Russell Thomas/Justine
Thomas winners; Heath/McKeown
runners-up; event played as a round
robin. Junior singles: Justine Thomas
winner; Russell Thomas runner-up; event
played as a round robin. Team event:
Jack Hutton/Justine Thomas (NW
District/Castell Alun) winners; Simon
Jones/Sylvia Health (BSC/Sealand YC)
runners-up.
Association
by David Lomas
NO less than five teams from Shropshire
will be involved in the Dunlop National
School Team Championships Finals
which are due to take place at Lea Green,
Matlock, Derbyshire, on Saturday
March 2.1st.
As well as the familiar names such as
The Grove, Mary Webb and Market
Drayton Junior there will be some
debutants challenging for honours in the
eight events. Three schools from Greater
Manchester-Stockport School (BI9),
Hathershaw, Oldham (G 16) and
Woodley Junior, Stockport (Gil) were
amongst the winners in the North Region
Finals at Pontefract on February 22nd.
Cumbria is well represented with
Parkview, Barrow-in-Furness, (B16 &
G13) and Yarlside (BII) - also from Bar­
row amongst the finalists. Derbyshire
and Lincolnshire are also in with a shout
in the shape of Gosforth, Dronfield,
(BI3) and Kesteven & Grantham Girls
GS (GI6).
Northamptonshire Schools have their
first-ever finalists in Wellingborough
School who were winners of the
Midlands & West Region Boys' UI9
event. But they face a stiff task in par­
ting South & East Region winners, Bed­
ford Modern, from their national title.
Market Drayton Junior School extend­
ed their record of having reached the
Under-II Girls Final for the last seven
years, winning the title twice.
Hopes are high that teams from the
South & East Region will do well at Lea
Green. Cumnor House, Croydon, return
to defend their Boys' U 13 and U II titles
whilst \field Community College (West
Sussex) look to improve on their third­
place last year in the Boys' Under-16
event. Thurleston, Ipswich are
newcomers in the Girls' UI6 event. They
are strong at I & 2 but past experience
has shown that invariably the No 3 & 4
players can make the difference between
defeat and victory.
Special celebrations are planned to
mark the 21st staging of the National
Finals.
Regional Finals winners:
NORTH (Pontefract)
BI9 Stockport School (G. Mcr)
GI9 Kesteven & Grantham (Li)
BI6 Parkview, Barrow (Cu)
GI6 Hathershaw, Oldham (G. Mcr)
BI3 Gosforth, Dronfield (Dy)
GI3 Parkview, Barrow (Cu)
MIDLANDS & WEST (Gloucester)
BI9 Wellingborough (No)
G 19 Highfields, Wolverhampton (WM)
BI6 Mary Webb, Pontesbury (Sh)
GI6 The Grove, Market Drayton (Sh)
BI3 Mary Webb, Pontesbilry'(Sh)
GI3 The Grove, Market Drayton (Sh)
SOUTH & EAST (Croydon)
BI9 Bedford Modern (Bd)
GI9 Luton 6th Form College (Bd)
BI6 lfield College (W. Sx)
GI6 Thurleston, Ipswich (Sk)
BI3 Cumnor House, Croydon (Sy)
GI3 Hillcross Middle, Morden (Sy)
.
@First in the field since 1795- still top of the I
28
I Players protest • and a reply
~~~~~~~_~~Tn~~~;?r~~~Jd~e~UNDY THE ANSWERS
AS readers will have seen from recent media coverage, the ATTP has criticised
the ETTA over the selection of only three women for the world championships
team to India, a country notorious for the debilitating bouts of sickness it in­
flicts on visiting Europeans, and in particular stating our view that ATTP member
Joy Grundy appeared to have been harshly treated by her omission from the
team.
We did not accept the reason given of
issues, but it has become apparent that
cost-cutting as being pertinent, when
our previous attempts at achieving
two reserve men have been selected to
diplomatic solutions to a number of
travel, and we understood that the
problems through discussion have not
borne fruit, and our suggestions of
chairman of selectors was also going
various changes and improvements
with the ETTA teams; we did not feel
this last expense could be justified in
seem to have been largely ignored, ex­
preference to sending a reserve player,
cept for one or two ideas such as the
which must be of paramount
top 12 and scoring up to II, which it
importance.
appears were seen as a quick oppor­
We furthermore asked to be inform­
tunity to re-establish the ETTA image.
ed of any other ETTA officials, um­
This apparent complacency and lack
pires or administrative staff being sent,
of regard for players' requirements is
and for what reasons, excluding of
what has caused so much dissent
course the two men's and women's
amongst leagues up and down the
team captains, whom we agree are ab­
country, and between players and of­
solutely essential.
ficials over the past two seasons, and
Neither do we agree with the
in our view lead directly to the elec­
premise of the need to cut costs on this
tion of the ETTA's fiercest critic, John
trip in order to send a minor team to
Prean, to the post of ETTA chairman,
the Czechoslovakian Open - in our
where we hope he is now assessing the
actions needed to remedy the situation.
view it is vital for the prestige of the
game in England that we send the
We at ATTP are certainly going to
strongest possible team and reserves to
continue to press for a change in at­
the World Championships, the most
titude from the governing body of our
important event in every two years
sport. In a letter to our association last
year, John Prean quoted to us former
play.
European champion Hans Alser's
Because of this we also criticised the
selectio~n of Matthew Syed as replace­
comment: "In Sweden, it is the players
ment for the injured Carl Prean; Mat­
who are important; in England it is the
officials who are." We know John will
thew is of course a very promising
young player indeed, and it may not
be striving hard to change this, and we
be too long before he is able to
shall help all we can.
challenge of right for a place in the
However, let's be quite clear that we
Swaythling Cup' team, but this top
and all our members know the debt we
honour and responsibility should in
owe to the large number of dedicated
our opinion be awarded only to those
people up and down the country who,
without reward or thanks, run all our
who have earned it.
We do not think his results or rank­
leagues and tournaments and serve on
ing justify selection this time, a view
committees simply because they love
the game as much as we do.
endorsed by many of our top-ranking
members, the majority of whom
Without officials there would be
nominated Nicky Mason as the player
very little properly organised and
who should have been picked.
structured table tennis, but also let no­
With regard to the question of ex­
one forget that playing is the game,
penditure, we know that many en­
and that without players there would
thusiasts share with us grave doubts
be no game over which to officiate ­
concerning some priorities in the
an obvious statement of fact, but one
utilization of ETTA funds generally,
that sometimes seems in danger of be­
and would point out that more finance
ing forgotten by the powers that be.
than ever before is being brought in­
To look at the brighter and more
to table tennis, including the largest
positive side of things, we are conti­
ever grant from the Sports Council to
nuing with our efforts to obtain
the ETTA of £360,000 over the next
substantial sponsorship for various
two years.
events and tournaments we have in
Additionally, sponsorship is increas­
mind for next season, notably a novel
ing, and we are perturbed that very lit­
series of international matches involv­
tle financial planning or allotment of
ing top English and Japanese players,
these resources has been made
sponsored by Japanese companies that
available; in particular we have again
we have approached, several of whom
asked for details and breakdown of the
appear to be interested.
£100,000 three year sponsorship deal
We also hope to stage a series of
with Stiga.
"North v South v West v Midlands'
We regret the necessity of publicly
mixed matches involving the countries
confronting the ETTA with these
best players from these regions.
by Paul Day
Chairman oj Selectors
12th February 1987.
Dear Mr. Baddeley,
Having read your letter to Mr.
Shipley dated the 1st February
1987, I must make the follow­
ing comments.
The selections you are com­
plaining against were made in
early December. Selection com­
mittee policy was on the agen­
da for National Council meeting
on January 10th, which your
representative was entitled to at­
tend. If you felt that the selec­
tions were in any way unjust,
why did you, or even one of
your officers, not take up your
invitation and question me
there?
You state in your letter that
your committee considered the
matter. I have, however been in­
formed that one of the officers
of your association and some of
the committee were unaware of
the contents of your letter. I
question the extraordinary tim­
ing of your letter, which arriv­
ed just prior to the world cham­
pionship and just prior to
a management committee
meeting, at which our chairman
overrode National Council and
changed selection procedure.
Add to this our chairman's veil­
ed criticisms of the selection
committee in the Daily
Telegraph article on the 9th
February, stating that basically
things would be better under'
single man selection, I just
wonder whether you really did
your considering with your
committee.
I honestly do appreciate your
personal concern for the players
and can assure you that in our
case, the committee did give the
matters very serious thought
before reaching the decisions.
The selection committee
vehemently believe that the
serious allegation of discrimina­
tion against a player must, and
can only, be answered in front
of the governing body of our
sport. The allegation is so
serious that I believe we would
all feel that if any member of
our committee, or anyone
holding any position of authori­
ty in our sport, discriminates
against, or even hints at
discrimination against a player,
they must be immediately
disgraced and removed from of­
fice. You may feel I am over~
reacting but I accept that our
position dictates that we are
having considerable influence
on player's lives and, as such,
the honesty and integrity of
anyone making selections, or
even influencing selections as
the case may be with advisors,
must be beyond question. As
Na~ional Council dictated that
I should be responsible for the
selection committee until the
new Vice Chairman is elected
and that I was chairman of the
selectors at the time of the selec­
tions, I believe I should be at the
next National Council meeting
to give detailed answers to your
allegations.
I hope this will satisfy you
and your committee and I hope
you accept that your allegations
are far too serious for just a
reasoned reply.
PAUL DAY
Wyndale,
Hall Street,
SOHAM,
Ely,
Cambs. CB7 5BN.
r
tables for quality and price
[[}OODtJ
HqUeB
29
ICrossword
1 st Prize
,I
2 sheets of rubber (of your choice) from
the~range
Supplied by DSR Leisure, distributor of the complete Stiga range of table tennis equipment
CLUES
ACROSS
1. Most definitely declined lift aboard well known elephant! (3,2,4,5)
9. Soldiers' leader and Sailor go to a Somerset spa on the day of rest (7)
10. S.O.S. - A ban for an ex Yorkshire Junior (7)
11. Cheap flight to the top (4)
12. Hew, tug iron maybe necessary when golfer is here after rain (2,3,5)
14. Be sure to find a landmark in Antarctica (6)
15. A pain in the cranium is a real nuisance (8)
17. Surrender Hampshire initially to one of its towns (8)
18. Caught following in the Territorials, but left untouched (6)
21. We take street to the capital - or part of it! (4,6)
22. Sharp reminder to 20 to get a move on? (4)
24. Cave Del chopped meat in? (7)
25. Added bonus when loopers miss the table (4,3)
26. Top security in the building trade? (2,4,2,6)
DOWN
I. Neat ass disturbed on the tennis-court (7)
2. Ban wet lines sent to this publicatin (5,6,4)
3. French tennis player who served on the Ark? (4)
4. [n place, with the ball ready to serve (2,4)
5. Prepared bat for play with eraser Editor used! (8)
6. Oriental sat uncomfortably in the saddle making for where Hull used
to be (4,6)
7. What National Clubs entrants have in common with Dalglish & Co.
(6,9)
8. Hope is dashed for this girl (6)
13. Temporary home of the Oldroyd Cup? (10)
16. Found on razor of enthusiastic barber? (4,4)
[7. Heave ball to Scottish Rugby town? (6)
[9. RAF fits reconditioned barriers (7)
20. They shoot them in the movies - don't they? (6)
23. Veteran Czech playing in the Mikado, with no publicity (4)
Name
.
Address
.
plus three consolation prizes of professional mini
bats supplied by
CLIVE OAKMAN Table Tennis
Entries should be sent to Mr Eric Hall, 38 Littlemoor Crescent,
Newbold, Chesterfield, Derbyshire S41 8QJ.
Closing date: APR[L 12th. Answers published: MAY 1987
FORTHCOMING FIXTURES
March
County Championships (7)
Selby Junior 1 Star (Selby)
SCHILDKROT BRITISH LEAGUE (13)
15
ESTTA National Team Finals (Lea Green)
21
19/22 COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIPS (Senior Premier Weekend)
Bedford 1 Star (Bedford)
28
International Hard Bat (Barnet)
28/29 Cleveland International Championships (Thornaby)
EUROPEAN LEAGUE: ENGLAND v Norway (Braintree)
31
14
WINNERS OF CROSSWORD No.3
January Issue
First prize, (Blade): H.A. Spraggs, 18 Fern Drive, Church
Crookham, Aldershot, Hants. GU 13 ONW.
Runners-up: Clive Oakman mini-bat 1, Anne Holland, 37
Norsey View Drive, Billericay, Essex CM12 OOR; 2, Robin Har­
ding, 11 Hordle Gardens, St. Albans, Herts AL 1 1JW; 3. P.J.
Capewell, 23 Firwood Road, Melton Mowbray, Leics.· LE13
1SA.
April
4/5
5
9
National Junior Top 12 (Lilleshall)
SCHILDKROT BRITISH LEAGUE (14)
EUROPEAN LEAGUE: Federal Germany v ENGLAND
(Wurzburg)
31
IMailbox 1
Disquiet on
coaching
I AM using the medium of the Table
Tennis News, so well utilised by
John Prean, to express my small dis­
quiet at a few of his early pro­
nouncements on becoming chair­
man. But first I must recognise the
good things that have been happen­
ing since his election.
For example, press coverage has
greatly improved. There are
possibilities of table tennis on TV,
albeit on Channel 4; and there is
reason to believe that John Prean
may be able to work small miracles
in the sponsorship field. These
things are essential to revitalise our
sport. Prean was elected because
people felt it was 'time for a
change'. Table tennis needed rescu­
ing and he was the man to do it.
There is still optimism. The signs are
generally good. But I feel a little
uneasy and need my anxiety
allaying.
I shall give just one example of
what worries me. 'Fhis regards the
coaching scheme. In the new ETTA
Newsletter (January 1987) - which
is itself an excellent idea - John
Prean lists some early achievements.
Good to start on a positive note.
But wait! After a few items which
show promise ahead, he comes to
coaching. What words of recogni­
tion and encouragement will he of­
fer to us coaches? "An urgent in­
depth study of the coaching scheme
will be undertaken. Despite many
good coaches the Sports Council is
unhappy about organisation and
achievement. I share their concern
... If that house is not put in order,
we shall lose Sports Council sup­
port, financial as well as moral."
And in 'The Chairman Reports
... ' from the January Table Tennis
News he states: "I am unhappy
about the coaching scheme and
some of the things I have learned
since being elected have horrified
me. I put it as strongly as that.
Urgent reforms are required. Action
will be taken."
The impression given is that the
coaching scheme is in chaos, a
disaster area. If this is so, then the
Sports Council which along with its
larger grant, contributes substantial­
ly to the national coaches salaries,
is rightly concerned. Now it is true
that a serious situation has been
identified, monitored and action
taken in part of the country. But my
impression of the overall picture na­
tionally is different. Prean's
statements are particularly inoppor­
tune as they come precisely at the
time that the coaching scheme is
moving forward.
Where I live and operate I have
been most fortunate in having the
services of excellent national
coaches. First David Fairholm and
now Nicky Jarvis. Whether in run­
ning sessions for 'stars' or learners,
exhibitions or coaches' courses, they
are always welcome by me. They
make a strong impact. And they are
highly respected by the Regional
32
Sports Council. Recently, and un­
solicited, some London PE teachers
told me that Dave and Nick had run
the best sports course that they had
ever attended.
A few months ago David
Fairholm became Director of
Coaching. It is still early days for
him, as for Mr Prean, and too soon
to make a proper judgement.
However, the first indications auger
well for coaching. He has been
working on training, up-dating and
improving liaison with coaches in
the field. In September he organis­
ed the best conference I have attend­
ed (and in my work I have been to
many). Every speaker at this Na­
tional Conference at Crystal Palace
was of top quality and the mood of
optimism, enthusiasm and buoyan­
cy was terrific to behold. In that lec­
ture hall there was a wealth of
coaching talent, including many top
players. But in total the pool of
good active coaches is too few.
That is the essetial problem which
faces the coaching scheme. Too few
people operate it. We have excellent
full-time national coaches/trainers,
but they work grossly excessive
hours and have to cover ridiculous
miles. They can take on no more.
There are also some superb player
coaches but their first priority has
to be to playing. At local level there
are many (but still too thin on the
ground) dedicated and overworked
amateur coaches. They too are do­
ing more than can reasonably be ex­
pected of them. The coaching house
is largely in order but it is too small
a house. If we ever have a sudden
upsurge in interest, we will not be
able to cater for it.
I am not complacent. Some
coaches use outmoded methods. A
few have unfortunate personality
traits and are inadequate. Others
need nurturing or prompting back
to action. However, most active
coaches are doing the right things
but there needs to be much more of
the same. More people to do the
same; not the same people to do
more.
Therefore, I would like to see
John Prean striving for more na­
tional coaches to inform, support,
motivate, enthuse and inspire local
effort; not just to train top players.
Full-time professional coaches to do
the essential public relations and
developmental
work
which
amateurs mostly haven't got the
time (and sometimes know how) to
do; meeting directors of education,
headteachers, sports hall managers,
recreation officers, sports councils,
etc., visiting local leagues, giving ex­
hibitions, running special sessions
and taking coaches/teachers'
courses.
Coaches/teachers' courses are
vital. Any interest generated to learn
to play table tennis needs to be chan­
nelled, but in many places coaching
does not exist. A huge and realistic
investment must be put into train­
ing coaches. As in any sport, there
is a huge fall out in coaches.
Thousands have to be trained to
produce hundreds, hundreds to pro­
duce tens. Although only a small
percentage will eventually be pro­
ductive, over the years they prove
their worth.
This training work is going on but
must be expanded so that in every
locality and not by chance, there is
good coaching. It is a slow process
that does not produce instant
results. A long-term strategy; but
remember that coaching is still a
most effective way to introduce
people to table tennis.
So I return to John Prean's com­
ments. No good comes from criticis­
ing the coaching scheme unfairly.
Prean has many great qualities ar­
ticulated in his beautiful clarity or
written prose. His passion and com­
mitment to table tennis are un­
doubted. But his frequent use of
stark words of doom and gloom can
demoralise, demotivate and under­
mine and give a negative impression
to outsiders.
Fair enough, identify problem
areas and challenges, but let us also
hear more of what he thinks is good
about the coaching scheme. More
words of praise for achievments
made. We all need support and en­
couragement for the hard task
ahead and our sport needs a positive
image.
Maybe I have misunderstood
him. Or, perhaps, there is something
dreadfully amiss that I don't know
about. If so, our chairman should
spell out exactly what he is getting
at and the premises on which his
conclusions are based. We might
then differ in our ideas about what
should be done. But we all want
table tennis to go forward and must
work together towards that end. In­
spire us Mr Prean! Motivate us!
Unite us in spirit! Don't knock the
coaching scheme without very good
cause.
KEN MUHR
23 York Road
Stony Stratford
Milton Keynes MKII IBJ
Another satisfied
customer
I MET John Woodford at a recent
county meeting and he asked me for
my views on the new format for the
Magazine.. My subscription had
lapsed (although I did not tell him
that), because I was doubtful if I
was getting value for money. Hav­
ing knocked around in the game for
over 40 years his remarks awaken­
ed my loyalty and conscience and I
sent a cheque.
Arrival was awaited with interest,
the easily identifiable envelope ar­
rived. Very thick and heavy: I was
getting my money's worth! Opened.
Two issues: A little dismayed I
pressed on because I took an instant
liking to the November and
December cover photographs.
Reading on I found two pur­
poseful editorials. The picture con­
tent was wider than hitherto, and
the Editor's claim that there were
regular columns in the Daily
Telegraph is so far, true. Forthcom­
ing events are clearly shown, the
Mailbox is interesting - although
I was surprised at Carl Prean's pi­
que remarks in the last paragraphs
of his letter published in the
November issue.
From what I have read so far I
have been converted to the view that
our new chairman, John Prean,
deserves a chance to achieve his aims
through the structure of the ETTA.
I think there is still scope for a wider
range of contributors.
Maybe it's me! I have tried Clive
Oakman's seemingly simple recipe
for the twelve stage rubber change.
No good. Sticky fingers and rough
edges! I shall apply to go on the
course!
On league match club nights I
take along my copy of TT News and
leave it on the scorers table. Very
few people fail to pick it up and
have a read. There is dormant in­
terest there. Question and sugges­
tion on how to increase circulation.
How can we (you) urge each af­
filiated club to buy a copy for the
benefit of its members? Through the
magazine, via the ETTA, by ap­
proaching league and/or club
secretaries? It is perhaps worth some
consideration if it is not an avenue
previously explored.
Looking forward to the next
issues.
BRIAN PETTITT
176 Tivoli Crescent North
Brighton
Sussex BNI 5NA
The chairman on
selection
I HAVE received a number of pro­
tests about the selection of the
England teams for the world cham­
pionships in New Delhi, some
privately, some via the national
press.
I understand what members are
saying, but for the chairman of the
association all members are equal
and have equal rights. If I were to
enter into selection controversies, I
would have to express preferences
for player A over player B which
may undermine the confidence of
players selected. It would be wrong
of me to do this.
It is well known that I am not an
admirer of the committee system in
the selection process. Teams should
be cohesive units not only in terms
of skill, but team spirit and com­
patability. I cannot see how this can
be achieved by majority verdicts and
compromise which is the way com­
mittees work, particularly such large
ones as have been assembled in the
more recent past.
JOHN PREAN
IMailbox i
We were there
DID it go unnoticed that on Tues­
day February 3 1987 in the English
National Badminton Champion­
ships held at Crawley the winner of
the women's singles was Fiona Elliot
who beat Gillian Clark 11-8, 11-3 in
the final. I seem to remember that
at Crawley on Sunday January 25
1987 in the English National Table
Tennis Championships finals the
winner of the women's singles was
Fiona Elliot who beat Lisa Bellinger
21-19, 21-13, 21-16?
HARRY SPRAGGS
International umpire
18 Fern Drive
Church Crookham
Aldershot
Editor's note: We were at both
events at Crawley, Harry, and we
did notice that the two Fiona's ,were
successful at both table tennis and
badminton. But perhaps you did
not spot that the new badminton
all-England champion has two
"t's" in her surname and not one!
ALL LETTERS SHOULD
BE SENT TO:
THE EDITOR
TABLE TENNIS NEWS
21 CLAREMONT
HASTINGS
E. SUSSEX
TN341HF
Umpire's
concern
I AM writing in connection with
your article which appeared in your
January edition of "Table Tennis
News" concerning "Foul Service".
Firstly I would like to draw your
attention to my article which
appeared in "Table Tennis News"
in one of the earlier editions during
1986 concerning the same points.
Before I go any further may I ex­
plain that I am a qualified county
umpire and I travel all round the
country to junior tournaments um­
piring from groups up to finals and
I wholeheartedly agree with every
word that you say as I have on
numerous occasions pulled players
up for foul serving and have been
confronted by all sorts of com­
ments. Players have turned round
and stated why do I pull them up
when other "national" and "inter­
national" umpires have let them qO
the same services and said nothing.
The next two instances relate to
two junior county matches played
at the Barnet Table Tennis Centre
during the current season, namely
against Kent II and Surrey II. At the
start of the current season we decid­
ed in Herts to do something about
this problem but unfortunately
things all went wrong when we
played hosts to Kent II.
At the start of the match both
34
Magazine story ­
Des pessimistic
I HAVE just read the interview
with Desmond Douglas by Ian
Stafford in Sportsweek magazine
and I was very disappointed in
what Des had to say.
He is critical of the state of the
game, especially in England, and
accuses the ETTA in the past of
appearing to not want to improve
the game.
I would agree that he is entitl­
ed to be critical of the ETTA in
the past, and that the 1977 World
Championships were not capitalis­
ed on, but to be pessimistic about
the future is surely not going to
help our cause.
The election of a new chairman
is touched upon and he appears to
dismiss this lightly. He is quoted
as saying: "I'm just waiting to see
if he puts right all his criticisms.
It's too early to judge yet, but I'd
be surprised if the game is any
healthier in a couple of years
time."
John Prean has perhaps been
the most vocal critic of English
table-tennis in the past, and now
that he has been voted into office
as chairman, with the promise of
sweeping changes and new ex~
the imposing of a minimum height
of 15cm when projecting the ball
upwards in service, would give the
umpire a little more time to see that
the provisions were adhered to ­
especially as regards striking the ball
periments, surely he requires the
as it descends. Furthermore, neither
benefit of the doubt at this early
the umpire nor the assistant umpire
stage.
is well placed to judge many of the
It could be argued that Des­
requirements of the service law. I
mond Douglas has already made
have already the experience of a
his contribution to English table
European League referee, sitting in
tennis by being our best player and
the position of the former end-line
a fine ambassador for ten years,
judge, declaring that certain services
but if he was sufficiently satisfied
were illegal (but of course not in­
to sign a three year contract with
tervening), but it was quite impossi­
the ETTA, then perhaps he should
ble to fault these services from the
portray a little more optimism
umpire's chair. Basically the re­
when dealing with the media.
quirements of the service law must
I have no intention of criticis­
be simplified. Perhaps this could
ing Desmond Douglas personally
come if the bat rubbers were
as he has been an excellent adver­
standardised.
tisement for table tennis over the
The other main point is the need
years, and he is rightly aggrieved
to educate the players, Here in
that compared to other sports he
Belgium we have coaching schemes
has little to show for the high stan­
involving many hundreds of
dard he has reached, but as an en­
youngsters, but there is little
thusiast of the game, I was disap­
evidence that effort is made to teach
pointed to read such views in a
them legal services, Coaches should
widely circulated publication.
surely make this an early essential,
Let's be optimistic about the
to avoid bad habits which are later
future and help to make our game
difficult to eradicate, At top level
prosper in the near future, and
players should set a good example,
hope that the likes of Desmond
and I deplore those coaches who ad­
Douglas will not leave the game
vocate serving very near to the
through disillusionment.
borderline of legality. There are
plenty of variations available
MARTIN HUGHES
without taxing the umpire and risk­
88 Dorset Avenue
ing losing the point immediately.
West Parley
How many coaches insist on a "visi­
Wimborne
ble service" when there is no assis­
Dorset BH22 8HP
tant umpire?
You will agree, I am sure, that it
is dangerous to pass judgement on
"foreign" umpires as such. There
are bad, good and excellent umpires
in all countries, but not all have the
benefit of training and meaningful
qualification. National umpire ex­
aminations were held in Belgium for
the first time last season! But to
follow your generalities, the English
umpire is well respected, and the
West Germans - doubtless due to'
the influence of Hans Giesecke ­
ALTHOUGH writing from outside
the jurisdiction of the ETTA, I wish . are usually very efficient. Of recent
to comment on your January years the French have taken umpir­
ing very seriously, and most do the
editorial. During four seasons I have
been training umpires in Bruxelles, . job efficiently. I have no experience
of non-European umpires. Once the
with the aid of material sent to me
legislation is put on a reasonable
by Colin Clemett and then
footing, the responsibility is clearly
translated into French, leading to a
Provincial Umpire qualification. My with the umpires, who NOW must
not shirk the application of the law,
candidates, usually less associated
with the technicalities of the laws The umpire is likely to be shot at by
than their English counterparts, are ill-informed spectators in all sports,
often appalled at the complexity of He must remain firm, calm and
polite at all times, and receive the
the service law. When it comes to
full support of the administrators.
the practical application there are so
Some attitudes need to be changed
many things to watch, all at the
same time, during a few fractions of if such a good umpire as John
a second. My trainers have a prac­
Masters is driven into retirement.
tical session with Expedite, and in­
DEREK TYLER
variably whilst they concentrate on
International Umpire
the application of this law the ser­
Vice-President ETTA, Sussex
vice provisions are overlooked!
County TTA and Hastings &
One appreciates that the law­
District TTA
makers have a difficult time, and the
Rue de la Gare 16
conclusions of the experts are
1040 Bruxelles
sometimes overruled. As a first step,
Belgium
Winner of a £5 lr~~~ ~~~~lr voucher
teams were told exactly what was re­
quired by them regarding service
and neither team captain raised any
objection.
However during the course of the
match I had reason to pull up a cer­
tain member of the Kent team for
foul serving and this was immediate­
ly objected to by one of the Kent
officials.
Secondly, during the Herts II v
Surrey II game played on Saturday
17 January 1987 at the Barnet Cen­
tre, we once again had a problem
over service when the Surrey non­
playing captain complained after
one of the Surrey players had con­
ceded 3 points in a row for foul
serving.
Therefore, with the above two in­
cidents you can see that I
wholeheartedly agree with your
comments and would like to see
something done in the near future,
otherwise there is not much point in
having any rules.
S. TEASDALE
County Umpire
c/o Barnet TT Centre
Barnet Lane
Barnet, Herts.
Foul serving
- Our man in
Brussels
ICotswold Select, Midland League
•
Bradley Billington wins
Cotswold Select
By Alf Peppard
OF the ten titles in the Cotswold
Junior Select that were up for grabs,
local prestige once again took a very
severe hammering at least to the ex­
tent that only one player - Howard
Williams of Stroud - did actually
get through his group and progress­
ed on as far as the 4th round, where
he met his Waterloo.
Bradley Billington whom I
understand has just left school re­
tained his U 17 boys singles title by
beating Damian Holland in the
final.
The Girls U17 singles was adven­
turously won by Debbie Toole
beating the holder Andrea Holt in
a flurry of rapid exchanges which
were either on or off.
The European Cadet Champions
- Michael O'Driscoll and Chris
Oldfield - proved yet again just
what a formidable combination they
have created when they swept to
success in the U17 doubles at the ex­
pense of Billington and Shaun
Gibson.
In the girls U17 doubles, Melanie
Carey and Andrea Holt after a
shaky first game got themselves
sorted out to win the final against
Ellen Meddings and Debbie Toole.
David Baker turned on the
pressure to convincingly beat Barry
Foster and take the crown in the
UI2 boys singles - after losing the
first game.
After a close win in the first game
Kate Goodall made few mistakes to
emerge respective winner at the ex­
pense of Sarah Williams in the U 12
girIs singles.
The UI4 boys singles was won by
Neil Bevan who beat Leigh Jeffries
quite convincingly.
In the girls UI4 singles Helen
Potts, highly reminiscent of her
elder sister Clair, won a much
deserved battle of tactics against
Joanne Roberts. This was a great
victory for the Cheshire girl beating
the No.8 ranked junior player.
The UI4 boys doubles was always
in doubt right up to the very end
when Jefferies and Gary Knights
beat Mark Stevenson and Neil
Bevan 18 in the third.
The UI4 girls doubles went to
Helen Wright and Susan Pengelly
who beat Kate Goodhall and Joanne
Roberts in straight games.
Footnote: During the two days of
the tournament, the Gloucestershire
TTA supported the Mayor of
Gloucester's (Councillor Anthony
Ayland) sponsored charity for
famine relief in UM - KEDDAADA
an impoverished part of the Sudan,
many tickets were sold and I'm told
that financial returns were ex­
ceedingly good and well supported.
Results of finals - Vl2 boys singles:
David Baker (C) b Barry Foster (ND)
- 13, 19, 17. VI2 girls singles: Kate
Goodall (Y) b Sarah Williams (MI) 19,
8. VI4 boys singles: Neil Bevan (C) b
Leigh Jefferies (WA) 16, 16. VI4 girls
singles: Helen Potts (CH) b Joanne
Roberts (Y) 14, - 18, 16. VI4 boys
doubles: Jefferies/Knights (ST) b Steven­
son/Bevan (Y/C) 17, -10,18. VI4giris
doubles: Helen Wright/Susan Pengelly
(C/DY) b Goodha!IIRoberts 20, 15. V17
boys singles: Bradley Billington (DY) b
Damian Holland (E) 10, 19. VI7 girls
singles: Debbie Toole (Y) b Andrea Holt
(LA) 22, 19. VI7 boys doubles:
Oldfield/O'Driscoll (Y) b Bill­
ington/Gibson (LA) 16, 14. VI7 girls
doubles: Carey/Holt (SO/LA) b Med­
ding/Toole (Y) 20, 16.
Bradley Billington - champion at Gloucester.
Midland
Leagues
Mens section
Division 1 Coventry A 6,
Wolverhampton 4; Gloucester 9,
Chesterfield I; Chesterfield 3, Derby 7;
Notts A 8, Coventry A 2; Derby 8,
Coventry A 2.
Champions Gloucester were pleased to
notch their first win of the season. Der­
by scored their fourth victory to main­
tain 100"70 success but they have to meet
Nottingham, also undefeated.
PWDLFAP
Derby
4 4 0 0 39 9 8
Coventry A
5 3 0 2 24 26 6
3 2 I 0 21 9 5
Notts A
3 I I I 17 13 3
Glos A
Wolves
4 I I 2 16 24 3
Birmingham A 301210201
Chesterfield
400411290
Division 2 - Bath 7, Stafford 3.
A good win for Bath who seem set for
promotion for the third time in suc­
cessive years.
Bath
Notts B
Nuneaton
Dudley
Stafford
Loughborough
PWD L F A P
4 3 I o 27 13 7
4 3 0 I 25 15 6
4 2 I I 22 18 5
3 2 I o 17 13 5
4 0 I 3 II 29 I
3 0 0 3 10 20 0
Division 3 - Notts 4, Glos B 6; Notts
C 7, Leamington A 3; Leamington A5,
Cheltenham 5; Cheltenham 2, Leicester
8.
William Dane led Gloucester to a good
win over promotion rivals Nottingham
C. He scored a fine treble and Dave
Smith supported with two more.
Cheltenham achieved their first point at
Leamington in a match dominated by
Graham Slack who had three wins and
a doubles win with John Turner. Notts
C maintained their challenge to
Gloucester with a good win over
Leamington.
PWD L F A P
Glos B
4 4 0 o 31 9 8
Notts C
3 3 0 I 17 13 6
Lincoln
2 I 0 III 9 2
Leicester
3 I 0 2 14 16 2
Leamington A 3 0 I 2 10 20 I
Cheltenham
3 0 I 2 7 23 I
Division 2 - Dudley 8, Walsall 2,
Eastwood 5, Stroud 5; Stroud 10, Coven­
try B 0; Leicester 6, Eastwood 4; Coven­
try B 0, Eastwood 10.
In a vital match, Leicester went 4 up
against Eastwood who fought back to
5-4. In the final set Richard Grimley clin­
ched it for the home side with 22-20 in
the third. Eastwood dropped a further
point at Stroud, battling back from 1-4
down. For Stroud Howard Williams
took his three and the doubles.
PWDLFAP
53113467
Eastwood
Stroud
3 2 I 0 21 9 5
Leicester
2 2 0 0 16 4 4
Dudley
3 I 0 2 11 19 2
Walsa!1
30038220
Coventry B
20020200
Division 3 - Nuneaton 8, Rugby 2,
Worcester 6, W. Bromwich 4,
Pontesbury 8, Rugby 2.
Worcester deprived West Brom of
their unbeaten record with a close win.
For the third time Richard Pratley won
his treble.
Leamington A
Worcester
W. Bromwich
Oxford
Nuneaton
Pontesbury
Rugby
PWD L F A
3 3 0 o 30 0
4 3 0 I 22 18
4 3 0 I 28 12
3 2 0 I 18 12
5 I I 3 24 26
4 I I 2 13 27
5 0 0 5 5 45
P
6
6
6
4
3
3
0
Division 4 - Coventry 10, Nuneaton B
0; Leamington B IO,Nuneaton B 0; Ban­
bury 10, Glos 0; Leamington B 0, Ban­
bury 10; Coventry C 10, Nuneaton B O.
A nap hand of maximum wins! In the
Leamington B v Banbury five went to the
third by Banbury edged home in them
all.
PWD L F A P
Banbury
4 3 0 I 34 6 6
Leamington B 4 3 0 I 29 II 6
Coventry C
4 3 0 I 27 13 6
Birmingham C 3 2 0 I 18 12 4
Glos
3 I 0 2 6 24 2
Nuneaton B
4 0 0 4 5 35 0
Bromsgrove
2 0 0 2 I 19 0
National team
competitions
Wilmott Cup - Quarter-finals: Bolton v
Northumberland (I), Leicester v Birm­
Division 4 - Pontesbury 6, Banbury A
ingham (2), Thames Central v Willesden
4; Coventry B 2, Pontesbury 8; Banbury
(3), Hastings v Plymouth (4). Semi­
A 8, Banbury B 2; Banbury B 6, Stroud
finals: 2 v I and 4 v 3. Fourth round
4; Stroud 6, Leamington 4.
results: Trafford I, Bolton 5; Stockton
In a top of the table clash, Pontesbury
0, Northumberland 5; Leicester 5, Pot­
edged home against Banbury A due to a . teries 4; Birmingham 5, North Herts I;
fine unbeaten performance by 15-year­
Thames Centra! 5, Romford 2; Willesden
old David Morris. At the bottom end,
5, North Middlesex 3; Hastings 6, Tun­
Stroud narrowly lost to Banbury B.
bridge Wells 3; West Cornwall 0,
PWDLFAP
Plymouth 6.
Banbury A
5 4 0 I 39 11 8
JM Rose Bowl - Quarter-finals: Nor­
Pontesbury
3 3 0 0 23 7 6
thumberland v Castleford, Pont (I),
Banbury B
3 I I I 13 17 3
Leicester v Wolverhampton (2),
Coventry B
3 I 0 2 11 19 2
Chelmsford v Newbury (3), Woolwich v
Leamington B 2 1 0 1 9 1 1 2
Plymouth (4). Semi-finals: 2 v I and 3
Stroud
5 I 0 4 16 34 2
v 4. Fourth round results: Ormesby I,
Leamington C 3 0 I 2 9 21 I
Northumberland 5; Castleford Pont 9,
Liverpool 0; Chesterfield 2, Leicester 5;
Junior section
Wolverhampton
5, North Herts I;
Division 1 - Birmingham B 3, Derby 7;
Harlow 4, Chelmsford 5; Thames Cen­
Notts A 6, Birmingham A 4; Derby 3,
tra! 2, Newbury 5; Woolwich 6, Hastings
Birmingham A 7.
3; Swindon 2, Plymouth 5.
In a terrific match, John Holland beat
Nicky Felton to clinch a win for Not­
Carter Cup· Quarter-finals: Sunderland
tingham over Birmingham A. This leaves
v Sheffield (I), Nottingham v Birm­
Wolverhampton without a defeat follow­
ingham (2), Ipswich v Reigate, Redhill
ed by four teams with only one defeat.
(3), Tunbridge Wells v Launceston (4).
PWDLFAP
Semi-finals: I v 2 and 4 v 3. Fourth
430129116
Notts A
round results: Ormesby I, Sunderland 5;
Wolves
33002466
Sheffield w/ 0 v Preston; Chesterfield 2,
Birmingham A 320120104
Nottingham 5; Milton Keynes -I, Birm­
Derby
3 2 0 I 16 14 4
ingham 8; Ipswich,.- 6, Harlow 3;
Coventry A
21011372
Willesden 4, Reigate',· Redhill 5; Tun­
Birmingham B 5 0 0 5 5 45 0
bridge Wells 5, Hastings I; Plymouth 4,
Notts B
2 0 0 2 3 17 0
Launceston 5.
35
ITournament
Scheduling
A NEW LOOK AT TOURNAMENT
SCHEDULES
by Colin Clemett
UNDER ITTF Regulations the referee of a tournament is
"responsible for the scheduling of matches by time and table" .
It is for this reason that the ETTA qualifying tests for referees
have always included the requirement for the candidate to carry
out a scheduling exercise for a hypothetical tournament and
this is a section of the test which carries a substantial propor­
tion of the total marks.
At the elementary level the re­
quirements are simple. The matches
in all events must be fitted into the
time and table-space available in
such a way that the players are given
adequate intervals between suc­
cessive matches without being kept
waiting about for long periods, and
so that the finals are held at a
reasonable time. It has been shown,
by the US Table Tennis Association
among others, that these objectives
can be achieved at least as well by
a computer program as by a human
planner, so why don't we delegate
tournament scheduling to a trusty
micro which will do exactly as we
tell it?
The answer is that there is a bit
more to the job than just filling the
tables with matches in an order
which suits the players and as the
standard of the tournament rises
there are additional ihterests which
have to be taken into account. An
obvious example is the need to stage
a particular match at a specified
time for television; if it is live televi­
sion there is not much scope for in­
accuracy by the scheduler, though
on the day he might well have to
wait until the broadcasters are
ready. However, televised table ten-
nis is at present a fairly rare occur­
rence and there are other considera­
tions which are usually of more im­
mediate importance.
There is, for example, the need to
provide spectators with reasonably
continuous entertainment. Of
course, it is impossible to forecast
with certainty which will be the best
matches but it is at least likely that
there will be more interest in the
men's singles than in a consolation
event and there is no excuse for
devoting all the tables for two hours
of the afternoon to get the sub­
sidiary matches out of the way. On
the other hand, it can become
tedious for spectators to have to
watch nothing but men's singles and
what is wanted is a judicious mix of
men's and women's events, singles
and doubles, if possible throughout
the tournament.
In pre-tournament planning, it is
necessary to assign tables to par­
ticular matches and even at this
stage some attempt can be made to
place the matches most likely to at­
tract spectators on the most conve­
nient tables. This is done at
Wimbledon, where the best matches
are normally scheduled for the two
main courts, and perhaps table ten­
nis tournaments should consider
designating certain tables as the
equivalent of Wimbledon's Centre
Court and Court One. This scheme
was used with some success in the
1977 World Championships at Bir­
mingham at, I believe, the sugges­
tion of the referee, John Wright, but
it does not seem to have been
followed up either in England or
elsewhere.
The fact that matches have been
assigned to specified tables does not
necessarily mean that the assignment
cannot be changed. Ideally, the
tournament would proceed accor­
ding to its prearranged plan and this
should certainly be so in the early
rounds, so that players know exactly
where to be at the start of an event.
However, it is sometimes necessary
to change table assignments to take
account of late-running matches and
there is no reason why the same flex­
ibility cannot be applied in transfer­
ring a potentially attractive match,
which may not have been foreseen
from the draw, to a "show" table.
In the finals, there is not the same
degree of freedom in that only one,
or possibly two, tables are available
but a little imagination can make all
the difference to a finals pro­
gramme. We have all sat through in­
terminable sequences of worthy but
dull finals while the audience
gradually drifted away and what
should have been the top matches
were played to 20 or 30 enthusiasts.
It may be regrettable but the fact is
that the mixed doubles, for instance,
rarely engenders the same spectator
enthusiasm as the senior singles and
it may be better to restrict the main
finals programme to a few of the
top events, with the "minor" finals
played earlier or later.
To take an extreme, why not stage
the singles finals and, say, one
doubles final during the afternoon
of finals day with the remaining
doubles and subsidiary events con­
tinuing during the evening? Spon­
sors and local dignitaries attending
finals would probably appreciate a
shorter but more attractive pro­
gramme and one which wa's better
attended. An early finish would help
also to get the major results to the
newspapers in time for next-day
publication and thus improve the
level of publicity for table tennis.
There are, of course, practical pro­
blems in staging a few finals in the
middle of a tournament and then
reverting to the pre-finals layout,
but are they insuperable?
For too long we have tended to
keep to the established format for
tournaments and it is time to con­
sider changes if table tennis is to
enhance its declining status. I do not
think (thank goodness!) that it will
ever be practicable to build into a
computer programme the sort of
imaginative approach to scheduling
that I am advocating. There will
always be the need for creative
minds to deal with circumstances
that are different for every tourna­
ment and to generate new ideas for
the benefit of players, spectators
and the sport. I am confident that
in the ETTA we have officials who
are capable of rising to this
challenge and I look forward to
their proving me right in the coming
seasons.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25
Rowden: Very much so. Far too
often commercial interests take
precedence and players are pushed
into using equipment which is not
100% suited to their game. In the
long run they don't get the same
results.
Les: How far do you see Jo rising
up the junior rankings over the next
year or so? Do you predict NO.1
spot here?
Rowden: To answer would put
pressure on the player which is not
a coach's function. My concern is
not so much with ranking positions
as to ensure that J 0 plays up to her
potential. At the moment she is
relatively successful but only play­
ing at some 60% of full potential.
I feel she has much more to give.
36
Les: What you say regarding rank­
ing positions surprises me. Surely
you are delighted that J 0 is sitting
there at No.1 and well ahead of the
field?
Rowden: Every season we have
anything up to three different girls
holding the cadet No. I spot - just
think of it over the last dozen years
some 30 No. Is - many have been
good competitors and quite a few
have represented England. Where
have they all gone? So much poten­
tial and most of it vanished into
obscurity! Being No. Ion the cadet
list is the very first rung on a long
ladder - it shows only that basic
training is over, that's all.
Les: Surely that is a somewhat harsh
philosophy for a young player to ac­
cept? It would appear that the Toad
to success is never-ending!
Rowden: And only the professionals
get there! Player and coach must
work at a programme of attainable
goals. First progress up the ranking
lists and wins at tournament level,
first minor ones then the big events.
But once the No. 1 position is
achieved it is necessary to set further
aims - any player who sits back
and is satisfied that they have made
it, is finished - there must be pro­
gress, and this should be to a plan.
Les: Let me finish off by asking just
what the plans have been for Jo this
season?
Rowden: In March '86 we started
working towards the goal of No. I
by Christmas; Jo achieved this on
Saturday 15 November '86. We are
now training for the Europeans in
July'87. Playing cadets in this coun­
try is no preparation for Europe ­
that is a totally different ball game
and something Jo has to be ready
for. Eurocadets are more of ,the
standard of our better juniors, most
of the time they are quicker to be
positive and some of their better
girls play the sort of topspin game
you don't come across from young
players in this country. The only
road to success in my opinion for
our young players is proper plann­
ing and preparation at all times and
much of this in the early years is the
province of the coach.
Les: Thank you for your time. I
have the feeling that a number of the
ideas you have put forward will be
of interest to other coaches with
young players near the top.
I Past,
present and future
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23
WILTSHIRE
YORKSHIRE
Laurie Selby
Rea Balmford
WATCH out, I'm back - that was
the message hammered out to
Wiltshire's top table tennis players
by Swindon's Steve McBean.
Steve, out of the game for two
years, roared back to win the latest
Wiltshire Ranking Tournament at
CaIne.
"It was great to be back," said
Steve who won the tournament
using a new bat because he broke his
old one four days before the event.
In the final against the experienc­
ed former county champion Terry
Bruce of Salisbury.
Steve battled back after losing the
first game to pass his biggest hur­
dle so far in his come-back.
Steve's win should push him up
to around number five in the
Wiltshire rankings. "I'm practising
and training three or four nights a
week. I'm feeling a lot fitter than I
used to and feel easier at the table,"
said Steve.
Now he is setting his sights on the
Wiltshire and Swindon closed cham­
pionships - and the Evening Adver­
tiser cup for winning the division
one averages in the Swindon' and
District League.
At present he is leading the way
with a 100 per cent record.
Claire Hunter made it a double
top for Swindon by winning the
women's section of the ranking
tournament.
With the Wiltshire number one
Claire Maisey in Australia, Claire
took her chance with a two games
victory over Brenda Lee, also of
Swindon.
NEWS this month comes from the
south of the county where Sheffield,
one of Yorkshire's biggest leagues,
reports on the present and the
future, and from Wakefield, where
enthusiastic veteran Cleeve Judson,
recent winner of the Veteran singles
at the Pontefract Open Champion­
ships, seeks to bring even more
togetherness to that fruitful area ­
Veteran table tennis.
Like most other leagues
throughout the country, Sheffield
has suffered some loss in member­
ship but, with 148 teams in eleven
divisions, the slump has been less
marked than in many areas, and the
steel city still attracts players from
as far afield as the West Riding,
Derbyshire and Nottingham.
A six year reign by Saint Albion
as champions of the Premier Divi­
sion was last season brought to an
end by the Castle club, and the bat­
tle again looks to be between these
two clubs.
Saint Albion who have added
high-flying youngster Chris Oldfield
to their squad of Clive Guest, Kevin
Thompson and Tony Hunt, won the
early season clash, but Castle revers­
ed the result at the second meeting,
and the sides are on level pegging,
eight points clear of third placed
Fletchers.
Castle rely on Paul Longstone,
Bill Grant and Mark Ward, all of
whom have come through the city
centre club's coaching scheme, and
they have high hopes of the last
named a 16 year old Myers Grove
schoolboy, recent winner of the
Tameside Junior, and so keen to
widen his experience that he makes
the 60 plus mile journey to Bradford
for a second weekly match.
Disappointment when the Herries
coaching centre which, under the
guidance of Roger Turner, had pro­
vided a steady flow of young
players, closed, but, on the credit
side, a new Dunlop coaching centre
has been established at Intake Mid­
dle School where Barry Blackburn
and a small band of helpers are
fostering young talent.
Disappointing, too, the demise of
the South Yorkshire Open, but
Sheffield is still in the business of
bringing top table tennis to the city.
There are high hopes of a visit by
the Chinese in the coming months,
while, by the time these notes are
published, the League will have
staged Rotherham's S.B.L. match
against powerful Grove - master­
minded, incidentally by Ian Mar­
shall, a Yorkshireman whose career
began with Beverley Grammar
School in the Hull Schools League
and Hull Y.P.I.
This means a return to his native
city for Steve Mills, now married to
a Kent girl and living in that Coun­
ty, and with Oldfield and former
Sheffield University student Chris
Rogers both in the home line-up,
there is plenty of local interest.
Results
Mens singles - Quarter-finals:
Steve McBean b Ray Hughes - 14,
20, IS; Trevor Lloyd b Steve Davies
(Swindon) 16, 17; Michael
Auchterlonie (Salisbury) b Bill
Moulding (Salisbury) 14, 14.
Semi-finals: McBean b Lloyd - 12,
12, 17; Bruce b Auchterlonie II,
-22, 14.
Final: McBean b Auchterlonie -15,
18, 14.
Women's singles final: Claire
Hunter b Brenda Lee 16, II.
Jasvinder Singh became the first
Swindon player to defeat McBean
this season when they clashed in the
Wiltshire inter-league table tennis
competition when Swindon A met
Swindon B. Jas went on to record
another good victory over'Steve
Davies but his side, Swindon B,
went down 6-3.
Singh put on quite a doubles act
in the Cotswold Two Star Select
junior tournament.
Teamed with England number 18
Richard Hutchinson of Ipswich, he
reached the semi-finals where they
went out 15-21, 19-21 to Chris
Oldfield (Sheffield) and Michael
O'Driscoll (Mirfield).
".~
I
..,
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