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Quality Transition Planning

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Quality Transition Planning
Quality Transition Planning:
Indicator 13
BIE: Special Ed. Academy
Sept. 15, 2011
Tampa, Florida
Juan Portley
Portley Education Consulting
Outline
Indicator 13 breakdown
Going beyond Indicator 13: Student engagement
(academic skills), self-determination skills, etc
Employability Skills
Questions throughout
Elements of Transition-Rich IEPs
Measurable postsecondary goals
Present level of performance – based on ageappropriate assessments
Transition activities and services, including course of
study
Annual transition goals
Designated responsibility, including adult agencies
NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist
Appropriate measurable postsec. goal in each area?
Is the postsec. goal updated annually?
Evidence of transition assessment?
Transition services to enable student to meet p.s.
goal.
Ind. 13 Questions
Transition course of study?
Annual IEP goal related to transition service needs?
Evidence that student was invited to IEP meeting.
If appropriate, evidence that a representative of any
agency was invited?
Further Ind. 13 Clarification
Each of the 8 questions include a “Yes”, “No”
for each of the three areas:
Postsecondary Education
Postsecondary Employment
Postsecondary Independent Living
Questions Defining a Measurable
Post-School Goal
Is it outcome-oriented?
Can it be counted (by someone)?
Will it occur after the student leaves secondary education?
Are goals for education or training AND employment
addressed (for most)?
Independent Living required for more severe.
Measurable Post-School Goals – Ex:
EMPL: After graduation Jeff will work on his family farm
growing corn.
EDUC: Upon graduation Janet will attend a community
college and study nursing.
IND. LIV: Upon completion of high school, Chris will play
soccer in a recreational soccer league at the YMCA.
P.S. Goal Non-Examples
EDUCATION: “Will attend college.”
EMPLOYMENT: “No idea.” or “Take vocational class
during senior year.”
Guidance: Include the Who, What, Where and When…
Assessment-Based PLAAFP
What kinds of assessments (informal and formal)?
Are the areas assessed the most important ones for this student,
given his/her postschool goals? (individualized!)
Are they age-appropriate?
Are they valid and reliable for the students you are assessing?
Who administers assessments? When? How Often?
How are results shared with students and with the IEP team?
How are results “tracked” over time?
How are results used to develop goals and courses of study, and to
determine service needs?
Assessments Found
“Postsecondary Outcomes Survey”
“SOP/IEP Review”
“Student contact/Transcripts”
Directions read:
• “Assessments used to determine the goals.”
Additional Guidance for Transition Assessments
Dr. Jim Martin, University of Oklahoma, stresses at least 4
important areas to assess:
1.
Self-determination skills – Self-awareness, Self-advocacy,
Self-efficacy, Decision-making, Independent performance,
Self-evaluation, Adjustment
2.
Career/vocational interests – reading, non-reading tools
3.
Basic (overall) transition skills – all relevant adult life
domains
4.
Functional vocational assessment (when indicated)– much
more depthful evaluation for those needing it
Self-Determination Assessment
AIR Self-Determination Assessment
•
•
•
Parent, teacher, and student versions
Available at www.ou.edu/zarrow/sdetermination.html
Cost: free
ChoiceMaker Self-Determination Assessment
•
•
Sopris West, Longmont, CO (www.sopriswest.com)
Cost: 25 copies $11.95
ARC Self-Determination Assessment
•
•
•
Univ of Kansas, Beach Center
www.beachcenter.org
- Click on downloads, then select books, manuals, reports - full pubs
Free
Vocational Interests for Students Who Can
Read
Group Interest Inventories
• ACT Discover and Explorer Tests
Paper Individual Interest Inventories
• COPS
• Self-Directed Search
Free On-Line Individual Interest Inventories
•
http://www.myfuture.com/toolbox/workinterest.html
• Similar to Self-Directed Search, but free
•
•
www.ioscar.org
www.careerclusters.org
http://www.careerkey.org/cgi-bin/ck.pl?action=choices
U.S. Dept of Labor O*NET
• www.onetcenter.org
• Interest profiler, ability profiler
Explore Interest Results
Occupational Outlook Handbook
• www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm
www.yesjobsearch.com
Job videos (English or Spanish)
• Individuals & Job clusters
• http://acinet.org/acinet/videos.asp?id=27,&nodei
d=27
Comprehensive Transition Assessment Tools
Transition Planning Inventory-Revised (TPI-R)
• ProEd, Austin Texas (www.proedinc.com)
Scales of Independent Behavior - R
• Riverside Publishing (http://www.riverpub.com)
Informal Assessments for Transition Planning
• ProEd, Austin Texas (www.proedinc.com)
Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Form
• www.estr.net
Casey Life Skills Assessment
• www.caseylifeskills.org
Free Resources for Transition Assessment
www.dws.state.nm.us – Job Seekers >> Career
Prospects System Occupational Profiler
U.S. Dept of Labor O*NET
• www.onetcenter.org - Interest profiler, ability
profiler
Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)
www.nsttac.org – “Age Appropriate Transition
Assessment Guide”
www.dcdt.org – “Age Appropriate Transition
Assessment” Fact Sheet
Transition Services and Linkages – Designated
Responsibility
Is the student likely to need outside agency services (for a
successful transition) during the next year?
For the current year, any evidence in IEP that representatives of
any of the following agencies/services were invited to participate in
the IEP development?
• Postsecondary education, vocational training, or continuing
and adult education
• Integrated employment (incl. Supported empl.)
• Independent living or community participation
NOTE: Must obtain consent to invite until IEP team member!
Transition Service and Linkages pg.
Instruction: NON-EXAMPLES
•
“Continued support in math, science….”
•
“Continue Math/Reading instruction to address areas of
need to prepare for college and career following college.”
•
Ind. Living: NON-EXAMPLES
• “Adequate personal care”, Will live in hometown or would
like to live somewhere in the mountains.”,
• “Plans independent living and has age appropriate skills.”
Transition Linkage pg. (cont.)
Employment: NON-EXAMPLES
“Currently works at ….”, He has learned….”, “Worked
at….”,
“Intends to enlist in the army, then attend college to
qualify for working game and fish department.”
“Develop job skills through cooperative training program
to prepare for p.s. life”
Comm. Exp: NON-EXAMPLES
“Family will seek to find areas of positive interaction for
…”
Transition Linkage pg.
Guidance:

Activities and Strategies should relate to p.s.
goal preparation. For example, the instruction
section should state more instructional things,
like research areas of interest, interview people,
register for dual credit, etc.
Example Transition Services/
Linkages Page
Activities/
Strategies:
INSTRUCTION
Agency/
Responsib.
-Teach Jeff the
Paraphrasing
Strategy
-Provide needed
modifications and
accommodations
in core academic
classes
-Research, identify,
& visit at least 3
colleges of interest
-School/special
educator teacher
Timelines
-Sept-Oct. 20011
-School/general ed -20011-13
teachers
-Jeff (w/case mgr
or transition
specialist monitor)
-Fall 2011
Documented
Completion or
Other



Example Transition Services/
Linkages Page
Activities/
Strategies:
EMPLOYMENT
Agency/
Responsib.
Timelines
Documented
Completion or
Other
- Research, select, &
complete one unpaid
and one paid (if
possible) internships in
law enforcement area
of choice
- Meet with DVR
counselor for eligibility
determination &
possible college
supports
-Jeff (case mgr
monitors)
- Fall 2011Spring 2012

-DVR counselor,
Jeff, parents
(case mgr
monitors)
- Winter 2011

Transition Services Includes the Course of Study
Same as (supercedes) the Next Step Plan; typically
problematic if a student does BOTH the Next Step Plan
and the IEP transition plan
Must name the electives in the plan
Lists courses/other experiences for all the remaining years
of high school
Helps to annually document credits earned
Must be individualized and linked to the student’s
postschool goal(s)
Example Course of Study (PED IEP form)
School
Year
Credits
Earned
Courses Selected
2010-11 5.5
Skills for Success (reading, future planning, personal mgmt)
English I, Algebra I, P.E./Girls Basketball
Physical Science, U.S. History
2011-12
English II, Applied Math I, P.E./Girls Basketball,
Keyboarding/Computer Literacy, Biology Concepts/Biology,
World Geography
2012-13
English III, Geometry, Girls Basketball, Psychology/Sociology
Spanish I (1/2 cr.)/Government, Work Study (1/2 cr.)
2013-14
English IV, Algebra II, Culinary Essentials/Sewing, Clothing &
Crafts, Public Speaking/Girls Basketball
Spanish II (1 cr.), Work-Study (1 cr.)
Annual Transition-Related Goals
What needs to be achieved this year to help the
student move toward his/her postsecondary
goal(s)?
What does s/he need to learn?
Is the goal measurable?
Is it outcome- rather than process-oriented?
Annual Transition-Related Goals –Examples
Becky will master the skills of “information processing” in
COMP 1001 with 95% accuracy, as measured by unit exams
and final exam.
Becky will demonstrate basic awareness of computing
occupations to the counselor’s satisfaction as measured by an
interview.
Becky will identify 3 post-secondary educational programs for
computing occupations in her careers class 9-week advisory
meeting.
Becky will articulate her accommodation needs in computing
environments through her interview with the rehabilitation
services counselor.
More Annual Goals Examples
 Jana will increase her reading comprehension skill levels
from 5.9 to 7.5 grade level equivalents by May 2011, in
order to move into post-secondary education as planned,
as measured by her scores on the standards-based
assessment.
 Jana will demonstrate acquisition of spatial concepts and
computational skills critical for a field of study and
career in visual arts, by passing her Geometry I class with
a B or better grade.
 By April 2011, Jana will create and apply a process for
analyzing her job shadow experiences, her results from
transition assessments, and her visits to colleges to
determine the most feasible area for planning an
internship the following year, as measured by her
comprehensive plan.
Evaluate the Transition Files
What’s the student/family vision?
Present levels?
P.S. Goals
Transition Assessments
Trans. Linkages:
Are they activities/strategies, present levels, or
goals?
Outside agency
Annual Goals
Going Beyond Indicator 13
Compliant paperwork only suffices compliant
monitoring requirements.
Program structure:
•
•
•
•
Work-based Learning
Academic engagement
Transition of all students
Self-determination skills
What the field knows
Students who work during school experience
higher levels of postsecondary success:
•
•
Higher ed./training
Employment
Student characteristics that matter:
•
Vocational skills/instruction/experience
• Career interest/aptitude awareness
• Career experience
• Career assimilation
Non-Academic Skills
• Soft-skills:
– Show up to work on time
– Take directions
– Work well with others
– Task engagement
•
What aptitudes does a student need for these skills?
•
How do schools teach them these skills?
Factors that increase student engagement
Interest
Feeling safe and secure
Level of self-efficacy
Relevance of subject to their lives
Time-on-task
Resources
NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist
O’Leary’s TOP’s checklist
NSTTAC’s training materials
Web-based examples and non-examples
www.nsttac.org
www.psocenter.org
www.ndpc-sd.org
http://education.ou.edu/zarrow
Contact information
Juan Portley, Ph.D.
Portley Education Consulting
[email protected]
505-459-8118
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